Have Exhibit, Will Travel

Contents of Abraham Lincoln's pockets. April 14, 1865. Rare Book and Special Collections Division.

Contents of Abraham Lincoln’s pockets. April 14, 1865. Rare Book and Special Collections Division.

True or false? Visiting Washington, D.C. is the only way to enjoy the collections of the Library of Congress. False. The Library offers a rich treasure trove of its collections. Not only that, it loans items to other institutions and agencies for their exhibitions, as well as offers other institutions and cultural organizations the opportunity to host touring exhibitions from the Library’s diverse exhibition program.

Just in time for baseball season, facsimile items from the Library’s vast baseball collections are on view at Nationals Stadium in D.C. and in Scranton, Pennsylvania, as part of the “Baseball Dreams: They Played the Game” exhibit. Featured in both displays are historic photographs of America’s favorite pastime.

Particularly relevant with the 150th anniversary of the end of the Civil War and Lincoln’s assassination are exhibitions at Fords Theatre and Henry Ford Museum in Michigan that mark the anniversary of the assassination. The Henry Ford Museum showcases facsimile lithographs from the Library’s collections, while Ford’s Theatre’s “Silent Witness: Artifacts of the Lincoln Assassination” has been loaned the contents of Lincoln’s pockets the night he was shot at the venue.

"Magna Carta: Enduring Legacy, 1215-2015."

“Magna Carta: Enduring Legacy, 1215-2015.”

The Library collaborated with the American Bar Association to commemorate the 800th anniversary of the sealing of the Magna Carta in 1215 with a facsimile traveling exhibit that will be making the rounds until Feb. 7, 2016. Copies of Magna Carta-related rare documents and artifacts from the collections have been touring courthouses, law schools, universities and public libraries, including Buffalo’s federal courthouse, Utah State University’s Merrill-Cazier Library, University of Michigan Law School, Georgia Bar Center and Oklahoma City State Supreme Court.

If you’re ever in Los Angeles, California, you’ll want to visit the Library of Congress Ira Gershwin Gallery located in the Walt Disney Concert Hall. The gallery hosts Library exhibits highlighting the institutions performing arts collections. Currently on view is the “American Ballet Theatre: Touring the Globe for 75 Years” exhibit. Following its closing in August this year, “Grand Illusion: The Art of Theatrical Design” moves into the space and will be on view through February 2016.

For more information on the Library’s exhibitions, many of which are available on line, and the Library’s traveling exhibitions program, go here.

Library in the News: April 2015 Edition

April headlines covered a wide range of stories about the Library of Congress. The Library recently acquired a collection of rare Civil War stereographs from Robin Stanford, and 87-year-old Texas grandmother and avid collector. “The images are rich and incredibly detailed,” wrote reporter Michael Scotto for New York 1. Michael E. Ruane of The Washington Post […]

A Whole New Ballgame

(The following is an article written by Mark Hartsell for The Gazette, the Library of Congress staff newsletter.) The Library of Congress is taking its collections out to the ballgame, reaching a new audience in a new venue. The Washington Nationals in April opened an exhibition at Nationals Park that, through Library photos, explores baseball’s […]

A Day of Mourning

This month marks the 150th anniversary of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. The 16th president was shot by John Wilkes Booth the evening of April 14 and died nine hours later on April 15. Several days later, Lincoln’s body would begin its long train-trek home to Springfield, Ill., where he would be buried on […]

Library in the News: March 2015 Edition

Headlining Library of Congress news for March was the announcement of new selections to the National Recording Registry. Time called this year’s selections the “most American playlist ever.” “If the Smithsonian is America’s attic, the National Recording Registry is the dusty box of records that America’s parents left up there,” wrote reporter Ryan Teague Beckwith. […]

Pics of the Week: Honoring Rosa Parks

The Library of Congress presented a special program on Tuesday to honor the Howard G. Buffett Foundation for loaning the Rosa Parks Collection to the Library. A special guest was U.S. Rep. John Conyers, who employed Rosa Parks in his Detroit congressional office for 22 years. Conyers described Rosa Parks as a quiet, humble person […]

Library in the News: February 2015 Edition

The Library’s big headline for February was the opening of the Rosa Park Collection to researchers on Feb. 4, which was also the birthday of the civil-rights icon. “A cache of Parks’s papers set to be unveiled Tuesday at the Library of Congress portrays a battle-tested activist who had been steeped in the struggle against […]

Here Comes the Sun: Seeing Omens in the Weather at Abraham Lincoln’s Second Inauguration

(The following is a guest post by Michelle Krowl, Civil War and Reconstruction Specialist in the Manuscript Division. To commemorate the 150th anniversary of Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address, for a limited time [March 4-7, 2015] the Library of Congress will display both the four-page manuscript copy and the reading copy of the address in the Great Hall […]

About That Cannon in My Basement —

A few years ago – around 2001, 2002 – I had a cannon in my basement in Rockville, Maryland. You could see it through the front windows, where it was aimed. I wondered if the mailman would report us to Homeland Security. It wasn’t a real one, but it was incredibly realistic and man-o’war-size (about […]