Under the Boardwalk

Panorama of beach and boardwalk from pier, Atlantic City. 1897. Prints and Photographs Division.

Panorama of beach and boardwalk from pier, Atlantic City. 1897. Prints and Photographs Division.

The travel and tourism industry owes itself to many historical “firsts.” In 1782, Scottish engineer James Watt invented the first steam engine able to turn wheels. On May 10, 1869, the completion of the first transcontinental railroad was commemorated with the driving of a “golden spike.” In 1794, the City Hotel opened in New York City, making it the very first building in America specially built for the purpose of being a hotel. In 1900, the first cruise ship, the Prinzessin Victoria Luise, was built. DELAG, the world’s first airline, was founded on Nov. 16, 1909.

And on this day in history – June 26, 1870 – the very first section of the Atlantic City boardwalk opened along the Jersey Shore. Located on Absecon Island, the boardwalk was also America’s first.

Steel Pier, Atlantic City, N.J. Between 1910 and 1920. Prints and Photographs Division.

Steel Pier, Atlantic City, N.J. Between 1910 and 1920. Prints and Photographs Division.

Dr. Jonathan Pitney, who thought the island would be a good spot for a health resort, first developed the area in the 1850s. With the help of civil engineer Richard Osborne, the construction of the Camden-Atlantic City Railroad began, and on July 5, 1854, the first tourism train arrived from New Jersey.

Because encroaching sand was a problem, a local railroad conductor and hotel owner petitioned the city council asking that a mile-long footwalk be established. The city used its tax revenues to build an eight-foot-wide temporary wooden walkway from the beach into town that could be dismantled during the winter. In 1880, the boardwalk was replaced by a larger version. More than a decade later, Steel Pier was added, which included a large amusement park.

 

To get an idea of what sunbathing was like during the early days of the Atlantic City boardwalk, check out this video from 1901 filmed by Thomas Edison.

Neptune (Hudson Maxim), Miss America (Margaret Gorman) at Atlantic City Carnival, Sept. 7, 1922. Photo by Bain News Service. Prints and Photographs Division.

Neptune (Hudson Maxim), Miss America (Margaret Gorman) at Atlantic City Carnival, Sept. 7, 1922. Photo by Bain News Service. Prints and Photographs Division.

These historic images from the Detroit Publishing Company also give a good idea of the boardwalk and beaches around the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

As a way to keep tourists around past Labor Day, the Atlantic City Pageant debuted in 1921 and featured bathing beauties vying for the Golden Mermaid trophy. Miss Margaret Gorman of Washington, D.C. won the first title. From this contest the Miss America pageant was born.

During Prohibition, Atlantic City was a hotbed of activity, with bootleg booze, gambling and other vices appealing to the revelers of the city.

In the 50s and 60s, the boardwalk was popular with stars of stage and screen, including Frank Sinatra, Marilyn Monroe, Dean Martin and Bing Crosby, to name a few.

Atlantic City. Photo by Carol Highsmith, between 1980 and 2006. Prints and Photographs Division.

Atlantic City. Photo by Carol Highsmith, between 1980 and 2006. Prints and Photographs Division.

Today, the Atlantic City boardwalk is known for its casinos, the first of which opened in 1978. And, the Jersey Shore remains a popular destination for locals and East Coast residents.

Travel and tourism are well documented in the Library’s Prints and Photographs Division. The Panoramic Photograph Collection features many images of travel destinations such as amusement parks, beaches, fairs, hotels and resorts.

The Library also has Pinterest boards featuring images of travel and summer fun.

Sources: USA Today, NY Daily News

 

Celebrating Juneteenth

This year marks the 150th anniversary of Juneteenth, the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States. On June 19, 1865, Major Gen. Gordon Granger led Union soldiers into Galveston, Texas, with news that the Civil War had ended and slavery was abolished – two years after the Emancipation Proclamation. […]

The Battle of Waterloo

(The following is a guest post from Taru Spiegel, reference specialist in the Library’s European Division.) Today marks the 200th anniversary of the history-changing Battle of Waterloo in 1815. This engagement ended in the conclusive defeat of Napoleon and his French generals and was a costly victory for the Anglo-Dutch, Belgian and German forces. The […]

Inquiring Minds: How a New Walt Whitman Poem was Found at the Library of Congress

(The following is a post written by Peter Armenti from the Poetry and Literature Center’s blog, From the Catbird Seat. Armenti spoke with a researcher who discovered a new Walt Whitman poem in the Library’s collections.) Walt Whitman enthusiasts were treated to a surprise last December when news broke that Wendy Katz, an associate professor […]

“First Among Many”

(The following is a story featured in the Library of Congress Gazette, the staff newsletter, written by editor Mark Hartsell.) The printing press that helped spread world-changing ideas of revolution, liberty and self-governance through early America grew from a humble beginning: a small, error-filled book of religious devotion, produced by a locksmith for settlers forging […]