Have Exhibit, Will Travel

Contents of Abraham Lincoln's pockets. April 14, 1865. Rare Book and Special Collections Division.

Contents of Abraham Lincoln’s pockets. April 14, 1865. Rare Book and Special Collections Division.

True or false? Visiting Washington, D.C. is the only way to enjoy the collections of the Library of Congress. False. The Library offers a rich treasure trove of its collections. Not only that, it loans items to other institutions and agencies for their exhibitions, as well as offers other institutions and cultural organizations the opportunity to host touring exhibitions from the Library’s diverse exhibition program.

Just in time for baseball season, facsimile items from the Library’s vast baseball collections are on view at Nationals Stadium in D.C. and in Scranton, Pennsylvania, as part of the “Baseball Dreams: They Played the Game” exhibit. Featured in both displays are historic photographs of America’s favorite pastime.

Particularly relevant with the 150th anniversary of the end of the Civil War and Lincoln’s assassination are exhibitions at Fords Theatre and Henry Ford Museum in Michigan that mark the anniversary of the assassination. The Henry Ford Museum showcases facsimile lithographs from the Library’s collections, while Ford’s Theatre’s “Silent Witness: Artifacts of the Lincoln Assassination” has been loaned the contents of Lincoln’s pockets the night he was shot at the venue.

"Magna Carta: Enduring Legacy, 1215-2015."

“Magna Carta: Enduring Legacy, 1215-2015.”

The Library collaborated with the American Bar Association to commemorate the 800th anniversary of the sealing of the Magna Carta in 1215 with a facsimile traveling exhibit that will be making the rounds until Feb. 7, 2016. Copies of Magna Carta-related rare documents and artifacts from the collections have been touring courthouses, law schools, universities and public libraries, including Buffalo’s federal courthouse, Utah State University’s Merrill-Cazier Library, University of Michigan Law School, Georgia Bar Center and Oklahoma City State Supreme Court.

If you’re ever in Los Angeles, California, you’ll want to visit the Library of Congress Ira Gershwin Gallery located in the Walt Disney Concert Hall. The gallery hosts Library exhibits highlighting the institutions performing arts collections. Currently on view is the “American Ballet Theatre: Touring the Globe for 75 Years” exhibit. Following its closing in August this year, “Grand Illusion: The Art of Theatrical Design” moves into the space and will be on view through February 2016.

For more information on the Library’s exhibitions, many of which are available on line, and the Library’s traveling exhibitions program, go here.

Celebrating Women: Women’s History on Pinterest

(The following blog post is by Jennifer Harbster, a science research specialist and blogger for the Library’s Science, Technology, and Busines blog, “Inside Adams.” Harbster also helped create the Library of Congress Women’s History Month board on Pinterest.) March is designated as Women’s History Month and this year the National Women’s History Project has selected […]

Pinteresting African American History

February is African American History Month, an annual celebration that has existed since 1926. This year’s theme, according to the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) is “A Century of Black Life, History and Culture.” This year also marks the centennial of ASALH, which was established in 1915 by Carter G. […]

A Jefferson Book, Rediscovered in Law Library

(The following is a story written by Mark Hartsell, editor of the Library of Congress staff newsletter, The Gazette.) A tiny, handwritten “T” at the bottom of page 113 offered a clue that this book – long part of the Law Library collections – needed a new home: the permanent exhibition of Thomas Jefferson’s library. […]

Inquiring Minds: The Document Man

Armed guards? Check. Secret rendezvous points? Check. Mysterious steel briefcase? Check. Sounds like a James Bond movie. But it’s just a day in the life of Christopher Woods, director of the National Conservation Service in Britain. By day, he’s a leading conservator in the field with more than 29 years experience working in the heritage […]

Curator’s Picks: Magna Carta’s Legal Legacy

(The following is an article in the November/December 2014 issue of LCM, the Library of Congress Magazine. The issue can be read in its entirety here.) Nathan Dorn, the Law Library’s curator of rare books, highlights five favorite pieces from the Library’s Magna Carta exhibition. Statutes of England “Intricate colored-pen work graces this 14th-century miniature […]

Library in the News: November 2014 Edition

The Library of Congress featured prominently in November news with the opening of a special exhibition and the celebration of a special individual. On Nov. 6, “Magna Carta: Muse and Mentor” opened with much fanfare, featuring the 1215 Magna Carta, on loan from Lincoln Cathedral in England and one of only four surviving copies issued […]

My Job at the Library: David Mao

(The following is an article in the November/December 2014 issue of LCM, the Library of Congress Magazine. The issue can be read in its entirety here.) Law Librarian of Congress David Mao discusses his career path to the world’s largest law library. What are your responsibilities as Law Librarian of Congress? I see the position […]

Pic of the Week: Princess Anne Opens Magna Carta Exhibition

Last Thursday, the Library of Congress opened a new exhibition, “Magna Carta: Muse and Mentor,” which marks two special occasions: Magna Carta’s 800th anniversary and the return of the Lincoln Magna Carta to the Library after 75 years, where it was sent for safekeeping during World War II. Guest of honor for the festivities, which also included […]