American Ballet Theatre Exhibit Closes Saturday

The Library of Congress exhibition, “American Ballet Theatre: Touring the Globe for 75 Years,” closes this Saturday, so if you’re in town, make sure to visit.

American Ballet Theatre (ABT), which celebrated its 75th anniversary in 2014, donated its archives of more than 50,000 items of visual and written documentation to the Library. The exhibition features a selection from the collection, including photographs, scores, costume sketches, posters and programs.

The ABT materials enhance and complement the Library’s many other dance, theater and music collections held in its Music Division, including the papers of composers Leonard Bernstein, Aaron Copland and Morton Gould, set designer Oliver Smith and choreographer Bronislava Nijinska.

The exhibition is on view from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the Performing Arts Reading Room, located on the first floor of the James Madison Memorial Building, 101 Independence Ave., S.E., Washington, D.C.

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