New Online: Presidents, Teachers & More Website Updates

(The following is a guest post by William Kellum, manager in the Library’s Web Services Division.) 

From the Thomas Jefferson Papers, a draft of Jefferson’s 1804 Inaugural address, in Jefferson’s own hand. Manuscript Division.

From the Thomas Jefferson Papers, a draft of Jefferson’s 1804 Inaugural address, in Jefferson’s own hand. Manuscript Division.

Presidential Collections

With the next presidential inauguration quickly approaching, we’ve updated a popular presentation from our old American Memory site on U.S. presidential inaugurations: “I Do Solemnly Swear…” A Resource Guide highlights items from the Library’s collections such as diaries and letters written by presidents and those who witnessed the inaugurations, handwritten drafts of inaugural addresses, broadsides, inaugural tickets and programs, prints, photographs and sheet music.

For Teachers

New for educators is a major overhaul of the popular Thanksgiving Primary Source Set, which has been updated with new content and a revised Teacher’s Guide. We’ve also put this set together as a Student Discovery Set for the iPad. You can see the full list of Student Discovery Sets on the teacher’s site.Untitled1

 

 

 

 

Website Updates

Following up on our big home page and user experience improvements release last month, we continue to modernize key parts of the Library’s website. News from the Library of Congress is now updated with a simplified design of our news releases to make the content easier to read and use on all devices. We’ve also gone back and touched up the data for thousands of news releases going back to 2001, making it possible to filter searches of news items by topic.

Last month, we completed the latest release of the Legislative System of the United States, Congress.gov. The release included enhancements to the homepage, alerts and saved searches, legislation, Congressional Record and Congressional Record Index, committee reports and new capabilities for the advanced search form for legislation. You can see a full list of changes or check out the Law Library’s detailed blog post on the release.

Writing the Great Novel

November is National Novel Writing Month. Perhaps you’ve heard of, or even signed up for, the NaNoWriMo movement. Encouraging individuals to write and complete a 50,000-word novel from November 1-30, the nonprofit movement provides support, inspiration and community for budding writers to pick up that pen or open that laptop. To date, more than 9 […]

A New Look at America’s Insurgents and the King They Left Behind

King George III of England: wasn’t he the one effectively told by the feisty New World colonists to “Nix the tax, Rex?” When they turned Boston Harbor into the world’s largest teapot, it was to get the attention of a government back home in England headed by George III, a monarch they would eventually disown. […]

World War I: Irving Greenwald’s WWI Diary

(The following is a guest post by VHP Reference Specialist Megan Harris, reprinted from the Folklife Today blog.) One look at Irving Greenwald’s diary is all it takes to bring to mind the old adage “good things come in small packages.” This World War I diary, written by Pfc. Irving Greenwald, was donated to the Veterans […]

World War I: The Man Who Killed Jim Crow

(The following is a guest post from Ryan Reft, modern U.S. historian in the Manuscript Division.) “No son has ever left home whose family had greater pride in him than we have in you,” wrote prominent Washington D.C. lawyer and African American civic leader William LePre Houston to his son, Charles Hamilton Houston in September […]

Here Comes Hayden: New Librarian Gets Busy Start in First Week

To say that Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden is all smiles, excitement and curiosity is an understatement. On her first official day in office last Thursday, her inquisitiveness and thirst for all things was almost palpable. Hayden began her day with a meeting on the National Book Festival. “This is so exciting,” she said, a […]

World War I: Conscription Laws

(The following is a guest post by Margaret Wood, a legal reference librarian at the Law Library of Congress.) Six weeks after the declaration of war against Germany on April 6, 1917, ch. 1, 40 Stat.1, Congress passed the Selective Service Act. Initially, President Woodrow Wilson and Congress had hoped the needed 1 million men […]

New Online: Presidents, Newspapers and Mobile Apps

(The following is a guest post by William Kellum, manager in the Library’s Web Services Division.)  National Book Festival The Library’s 16th Annual National Book Festival takes place on Saturday, Sept. 24, at the Washington Convention Center in Washington D.C., and we’ve updated our Mobile App and website with all the details. The app, available […]

Rare Book of the Month: “I am Anne Rutledge…”

(The following is a guest blog post written by Elizabeth Gettins, Library of Congress digital library specialist.) This week, we not only celebrate the birthday of author Edgar Lee Masters (Aug. 23, 1868) but also observe the untimely death of Ann Rutledge (Aug. 25, 1835), who figured in his best-known work. Masters spent his childhood […]

World War I: When Wurst Came to Worst

(The following post is by Jennifer Gavin, senior public affairs specialist at the Library of Congress.) In the United States, a century ago, there were more than 8 million citizens of German origin or with German ancestry – the largest single group among those of foreign birth or ancestry, but still less than 10 percent […]