Library in the News: April 2016 Edition

April headlines covered a wide range of stories about the Library of Congress.

Poet Laureate Juan Felipe Herrera continues to make the news, especially with the April announcement of his returning for a second term.

Herrera told Sara Catania of Reuters that poetry fans provided an “inspiration tsunami” during his first year in which he shepherded a crowd-sourced poem and addressed high-profile tragedies.

For his second term, he told Ron Charles of The Washington Post that he’s considering a “superhero story for children” that they would assist in writing online in addition to outreach to young people with special needs.

Speaking to his hometown newspaper the Fresno Bee Herrera said there was much more work to be done and that he was grateful and honored to be reappointed.

Mentalfloss offered 10 facts about the Poet Laureate position for Poetry Month in which they highlighted Herrera’s second term.

Also “returning” to the Library was the StoryCorps mobile recording booth, which has been on tour since 2005. The Library of Congress is the repository for the oral histories collected as part of the project, which launched in 2003. Kicking off the Library tour stop was WAMU’s Diane Rehm and her son David. Washingtonian covered the event.

The Library has certainly honored and hosted its fair share of notable individuals through the years. In April, the institution celebrated writer Mario Vargas Llosa and awarded him its Living Legend Award.

“Living, yes, I think I am living,” he told the crowd at the festivities on Monday night (as reported in the New York Times). “Not a legend.”

And, putting the spotlight on the Library of Congress itself was Ryan Cooper for The Week.

“It’s a place where you feel the weight of history pressing down,” he wrote. “‘Is this tweet really the best use of your time?’ it says. ‘Shouldn’t you be unraveling the mysteries of the universe, or writing the next great American novel?’ … “Under the dome of the Main Reading Room — as with the Capitol Rotunda — the demand to live up to the national ancestors is almost palpable.”

Library in the News: March 2016 Edition

Headlining Library of Congress news for March was the announcement of new selections to the National Recording Registry. Michael O’Sullivan of The Washington Post spoke with singer Gloria Gaynor, whose “I Will Survive” was one of the selections. “For Gaynor, the Library of Congress honor simply acknowledges what the world has already figured out,” he […]

Library in the News: February 2016 Edition

In February, the Library added a host of resources to its offerings, both onsite and online. Early February, the Library debuted a new exhibition on “Jazz Singers,” which offers perspectives on the art of vocal jazz, featuring singers and song stylists from the 1920s to the present. The ArtsBeat blog of the New York Times called […]

Library in the News: January 2016 Edition

January was a month filled with awards and honors. The Library welcomed Gene Luen Yang as the fifth National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature. Michael Cavna of The Washington Post covered the inauguration ceremony and wrote, “Yang — a charismatic, high-energy speaker — was able to present himself dually as both authentically dimensional scholar and […]

Library in the News: December 2015 Edition

While the new year is upon us, the Library’s headlines in December are worth looking back on. Topping the news was the announcement of the new selections to the National Film Registry. Outlets noted recognizable films such as “Ghostbusters” and “Top Gun” along with some of the list’s more obscure titles. “If there are any […]

Library in the News: November 2015 Edition

Willie Nelson was the talk of the town as the Library celebrated his work and career during a concert in November, as he received the Gershwin Prize for Popular Song. “When Willie took the stage to accept the Gershwin prize, you could see the pride on his face,” wrote Brendan Kownacki for Hollywood on the […]

LC in the News: October 2015 Edition

In October, the Library of Congress celebrated a major milestone – Chronicling America, a free, online searchable database of historic U.S. newspapers, posted its 10 millionth page. To mark the milestone, the Library published a series of lists on its social media featuring interesting and off-beat content from the online archive. Several outlets picked up […]

Opening Day … For the Library

Until 1897, the Library of Congress was housed in the U.S. Capitol Building itself. Librarian of Congress Ainsworth Rand Spofford (1864–97) was the first to propose that the Library be moved to a dedicated building. He also was instrumental in establishing the copyright law of 1870, which placed the Copyright Office in the Library and […]

Library in the News: September 2015 Edition

In September, the Library of Congress had some big headlines – from the announcements of new collections to celebrating the 15th annual National Book Festival and the inaugural reading of the new poet laureate. The Library received a very special visitor and a very special book to add to its collections last month. During his […]

Philosophers Habermas and Taylor to Share $1.5 Million Kluge Prize

The following post, written by Jason Steinhauer, was originally published on the blog Insights: Scholarly Work at the John W. Kluge Center. Jürgen Habermas and Charles Taylor, two of the world’s most important philosophers, will share the prestigious $1.5 million John W. Kluge Prize for Achievement in the Study of Humanity awarded by the Library of […]