LC in the News: October 2014 Edition

Just as the Washington Nationals were closing out a winning baseball season, the Library of Congress discovered rare footage of the Washington Senators’ 1924 World Series victory over the New York Giants.

Finding footage that has probably not been seen since its last theatrical run 90 years ago is usually a moment for celebration for fans and archivists,” wrote New York Times reporter Richard Sandomir. “For followers of baseball in Washington, the 1924 World Series victory was the only one for the franchise until it moved to Minnesota as the Twins and won championships in 1987 and 1991.”

“When archivists from the Library’s Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation watched the reel, they found nearly four minutes of footage from that 1924 World Series, footage that somehow had remained in nearly perfect condition for 90 years,” wrote Washington Post reporter Dan Steinberg. “Bucky Harris hitting a home run, Walter Johnson pitching four innings of scoreless relief, Muddy Ruel scoring the winning run, fans storming Griffith Stadium’s field: It was all there, and it was all glorious.”

In other news, the Library launched an initiative to celebrate another pastime, as it were: Halloween. The American Folklife Center has been gathering photographs of people participating in the traditions and celebrations at the end of October and beginning of November in an effort to create an archival photo collection of this slice of folklife.

“This is a good chance to show off your photography skills and maybe be a part of the annals of history,” wrote Tanya Pai for the Washingtonian.

Promoting the initiative were other outlets including McClatchy News Service, School Library Journal and Boing Boing.

Speaking of photographs, Mashable ran a fascinating pictorial piece on photographs by a young Stanley Kubrick while working for Look Magazine. The Library is home to the magazine’s archives.

2014 marked the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Panama Canal. The Library has a variety of resources related to the historic waterway and pulled items from the collections for a special exhibit. C-Span’s American Artifacts series presented a feature on the canal and the Library’s collections.

C-SPAN also covered a Library symposium that was part of the ongoing commemoration of the Civil Rights Act. Former member of the Black Panther Party, Bill Jennings, joined author Lauren Araiza to discuss multiracial coalitions during the civil rights movements of the 1960s and 70s.

In addition, Christian Science Monitor chose the Library’s exhibition “The Civil Rights Act of 1964: A Long Struggle for Freedom” as a “top pick” in the arts for October saying “Smartly written, it highlights images, letters, and audio components from the library’s collection to illustrate the fight to establish social and racial equality.”

The Library of Congress continues to be recognized for its innovation and commitment to advancing human knowledge, creativity and understanding. The Good Magazine’s Cities Project recently named the institution a “Hub for Progress” noting that the Library and other locations have “emerged as particularly kind to collaboration and innovation, ushering along vital advances for human progress in a diverse range of fields.”

The Fall/Winter 2014 issue of Geico NOW magazine called the Library a “world leader” and “Library of dreams.”

Library in the News: September 2014 Edition

On Sept. 10, the Library opened the exhibition “The Civil Rights Act of 1964: A Long Struggle for Freedom.” Covering the opening were outlets including the National Newspapers Publishing Association, the Examiner and regional outlets from New York to Alabama. “A few things set this exhibition apart from the multitude of this year’s commemorations,” wrote […]

Library in the News: August 2014 Edition

In August, the Library of Congress was busy with exhibitions and expositions, opening “American Ballet Theatre: Touring the Globe for 75 Years” on Aug. 14 and hosting the 14th annual National Book Festival on Aug. 30. “At the company’s heart was ballet theater, a physical way of creating a new world onstage,” wrote Sarah Kaufman […]

Library in the News: July 2014 Edition

The Library of Congress had two major announcements in July, featuring well-known public figures, that garnered several headlines. Billy Joel was named the next recipient of the Gershwin Prize for Popular Song. Stories ran in Rolling Stone, the Dallas Morning News, The Washington Post, The New York Times and The Today Show. Joel was also featured as […]

LC in the News: June 2014 Edition

The Library of Congress welcomed Charles Wright as the institution’s 20th Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry for 2014-2015. Several major news outlets ran stories. “Our next poet laureate may end up speaking on behalf of the more private duties of the poet — contemplation, wisdom, searching — rather than public ones,” said reporter Craig Morgan […]

Library in the News: May 2014 Edition

As May came to an end, so did the second and final term of Natasha Trethewey as U.S. Poet Laureate. She gave her final lecture at the Library of Congress on May 14. “At the Library of Congress on Wednesday night, Trethewey began, as she often does, with her personal history and then moved into […]

Library in the News: April 2014 Edition

The Library made several major announcements in April, including new additions to the National Recording Registry. The addition of the 25 new recordings to the National Recording Registry brings the list to a total of 400 sound recordings. Among the new selections were Jeff Buckley’s haunting single “Hallelujah” from his one and only studio album; […]

Letter to the Editor

(The following is a guest post by Barbara Bair, historian in the Library of Congress Manuscript Division.) While life posed many setbacks for Teddy Roosevelt (1858-1919), he proved himself a man who met challenges and seized his opportunities. When it came to the Spanish American War in 1898, Roosevelt carefully devised public acclaim as a […]

Library in the News: March 2014 Edition

March news headlines included a variety of stories about the Library of Congress. Of particular interest was a 10,000-item milestone – with the addition of a set of priceless manuscripts from the Walters Art Museum of Baltimore to the online Library-cosponsored World Digital Library, which now holds more than 10,000 items following its 2009 launch. […]

Library in the News: February 2014 Edition

News in February brought word of several Library of Congress collection resources. Here are a few headlines. On January 30, the Library launched an online collection showcasing selected items from the Carl Sagan and Ann Druyan Archive, along with elements from other important science-related collections at the Library. Gizmodo highlighted eight of the most fascinating items from […]