Where Poetry Lives

The Library of Congress’s poetry blog, From the Catbird Seat,” has run a few posts on Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey’s second-term project, “Where Poetry Lives.” For her project, Trethewey has joined NewsHour Senior Correspondent Jeffrey Brown for a series of on-location reports in various cities across the United States to explore several large societal issues, through a focused lens offered by poetry and her own coming-to-the-art.

According to Robert Casper, head of the Library’s Poetry and Literature Center, “‘Where Poetry Lives,’ has offered her the opportunity to see first-hand how poetry strengthens our communities. She has travelled from coast-to-coast and met people from different backgrounds and at different parts of their lives, all of whom connected to her and to each other through the art.”

Since September of last year, Trethewey has traveled to Brooklyn to spend time with the Alzheimer’s Poetry Project, to Detroit to visit Motor City middle-schoolers and to Boston for a reading and writing workshop for medical students, among others.

Now all of the content from the series—the segments themselves as well as additional content the NewsHour staff have created—lives on one website. Visit “Where Poetry Lives” to watch all related content.

And, make sure to check out Casper’s blog posts on the series and some of his experiences traveling with the Poet Laureate to produce some of the segments: On the First NewHour Segment with the Poet Laureate, Tune In Tonight! and Finding “Where Poetry Lives.”

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Today marked a rather monumental occasion as the space shuttle Discovery made its final flight – not to the stars but to its permanent home at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum annex near Dulles, Va. Library of Congress staff members were able to capture its final spin, as it took a few turns […]

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Hey There

If you love Broadway, we have a treat for you.  The Music Division of the Library of Congress has received a collection from the estate of Broadway giant John Raitt, who originated the role of Billy Bigelow in the Rodgers and Hammerstein show “Carousel” and also starred in “The Pajama Game,” “Oklahoma!” and other top […]