Sports Gold

(The following is a guest post by Matthew Barton, curator of recorded sound in the Library’s Motion Picture, Broadcasting and Recorded Sound Division.) Last year, the Library of Congress acquired the first of more than 10,000 radio interviews conducted by Ron Barr, founder and host of radio’s Sports Byline USA. The interviews date from 1988 […]

A Grand Hotel on the Cycle of Creativity

(The following is a guest post by the Library’s Director of Communications, Gayle Osterberg.) I have been reading with enthusiasm recent interviews with the screenwriter/director Wes Anderson about his forthcoming film “The Grand Budapest Hotel,” not only because I am a fan of Mr. Anderson’s work, but because he has been talking about the Library […]

InRetrospect: February 2014 Blogging Edition

Between winter and the winter olympics, the Library of Congress blogosphere offered up a variety of posts during February. Here is a sampling: In The Muse: Performing Arts Blog ASCAP on the Occasion of its 100th Birthday with Jimmy Webb and Paul Williams The Library celebrates ASCAP. From the Catbird Seat: Poetry & Literature at […]

Library in the News: February 2014 Edition

News in February brought word of several Library of Congress collection resources. Here are a few headlines. On January 30, the Library launched an online collection showcasing selected items from the Carl Sagan and Ann Druyan Archive, along with elements from other important science-related collections at the Library. Gizmodo highlighted eight of the most fascinating items from […]

Ten Thousand Treasures

The World Digital Library – a website of world cultural treasures offered free of charge in seven languages to anyone on the planet with access to the Internet – has put up its 10,000th offering. It was part of a package, actually – a group of rare manuscripts from the collections of the Walters Art […]

Pics of the Week: Celebrating Women’s History

The Library of Congress is an incomparable resource for research into women’s history and studies, which is especially appropriate in March, Women’s History Month. This year’s theme is “Celebrating Women of Character, Courage and Commitment.” Spanning all time periods, classes, races and occupations, the Library’s women’s history resources are among the finest and most comprehensive […]

Inquiring Minds: A Study of Mental Health

(The following is a guest post by Jason Steinhauer, program specialist in the Library’s John W. Kluge Center.) Manuella Meyer is the David B. Larson Fellow in Health & Spirituality at the Library’s John W. Kluge Center and assistant professor of history at the University of Richmond. Her research examines the socio-political and medical terrain […]

Conservation Corner: Rare Drawing by Martin Ramirez Conserved and Unveiled

(The following is a guest post by Holly Krueger, head of the Paper Conservation Section of the Library of Congress Preservation Directorate.) Last December, the Library of Congress unveiled a remarkable drawing by the “outsider artist,” Martin Ramirez. The drawing depicts a Madonna figure standing on a blue globe surrounded by canyons filled with anthropomorphic […]

George Washington’s Philadelphia Household, 1793-1794

(The following is a guest post by Julie Miller, specialist in early American history in the Library of Congress Manuscript Division.) Think of all the things your household buys and uses. Now think of George Washington. He was the commander of the Continental Army, first president of the United States and the father of our […]

My Job at the Library: Karen Keninger

Karen Keninger, director of the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped in the Library of Congress, discussed new technological developments in the interview excerpted below. What are your responsibilities as the Director of the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped? The National Library Service (NLS) program has approximately 120 […]