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Places in Civil War History: Tensions in Northern Virginia and Defending Washington

This is part of a series of guest posts from Ed Redmond, Cartographic Specialist in the Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division, documenting the cartographic history of maps related to the American Civil War, 1861-1865. The posts will appear on a regular basis.

As the nation moved towards an increasingly inevitable “war between the states,” both Union and Confederate forces continued to mobilize. Northern Virginia, today a bustling suburban region was part of a state that had seceded from the Union, and Washington, D.C. was the capital of the United States. Fairfax County, Virginia was home to Confederate forces and sympathizers while Washington was turning into a heavily defended town. It was only a matter of time before skirmishes and large scale battles broke out.

In early June 1861, several minor skirmishes between Union and Confederate forces occurred near Fairfax Court House and Arlington Mills in eastern Fairfax County, Virginia. An anonymous manuscript map of Fairfax County found among the Papers of Jubal Anderson Early, a Colonel in the Army of the Confederate States of America, which shows the major settlements, streams, and roads in the county. It is likely that Early acquired or used the map in connection with the movement of forces prior to the July 21st engagement at Battle of First Manassas/Bull Run.

Fairfax Sketch

“Sketch of eastern portion of Fairfax County, Va., June 1861.” [Anonymous] 1861. Transferred from the Jubal Anderson Early Papers in the Manuscript Division. Geography and Map Division, Library of Congress.

Military forces operating in unfamiliar territory relied on local inhabitants for information and supplies. As seen on F.F. Mead’s manuscript Map of part of Fairfax County, Virginia…, the names of landowners in Fairfax County are followed by either an “S” or “U”. While the map does not include information on the abbreviations it is likely that they refer to either the “Secessionist” or “Unionist” sympathies of the landowner.

With regional tensions on the rise, it became necessary for the U.S. Government to begin preparing the defenses of Washington, D.C. In 1857, Albert Boschke, a German born civil engineer, had published his Map of Washington City, District of Columbia, seat of the federal government: respectfully dedicated to the Senate and the House of Representatives of the United States of North America which showed, for the first time, the location of every structure in the city as of the publication date.

Following the publication of the 1857 map, Boschke and his surveyors continued surveying the entire District of Columbia, sometimes referred to as the “ten mile square,” which resulted in his landmark Topographical map of the District of Columbia. Published in 1861, near the outbreak of the war, this very detailed map showing the locations of all the structures in the city was a potential threat to the security of the entire city, the seat of the federal government.

Boschke Topographic

“Topographical map of the District of Columbia” Albert Boschke 1861. Geography and Map Division, Library of Congress.

According to an 1894 article by Marcus Baker in the National Geographic Magazine, Boschke sold his interest in the map to the publisher, David McClelland. Shortly after publication, representatives from the War Department seized the original manuscript and copper plates from which the map was published to prevent dissemination of the map.

Phillips Map Society Event Explores World War I Mapmaking

The following guest post is by Ryan Moore, a cartographic specialist in the Geography and Map Division. In World War I, the detail and accuracy of maps improved rapidly over the course of a few years and greatly enhanced the power of military forces. Maps, however, were only as good as those interpreting them, and […]

Modest Monuments: The District of Columbia Boundary Stones

The oldest set of federally placed monuments in the United States are strewn along busy streets, hidden in dense forests, lying unassumingly in residential front yards and church parking lots. Many are fortified by small iron fences, and one resides in the sea wall of a Potomac River lighthouse. Lining the current and former boundaries […]

Places in Civil War History: Fort Sumter and Virginia Secession

This is the third in a series of guest posts from Ed Redmond, Cartographic Specialist in the Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division, documenting the cartographic history of maps related to the American Civil War, 1861-1865. The posts will appear on a regular basis. On April 12, 1861, the first salvos of the American […]

Places in American Civil War History: Preparation for War

This is the second in a series of guest posts from Ed Redmond, Cartographic Specialist in the Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division, documenting the cartographic history of maps related to the American Civil War, 1861-1865. The posts will appear on a regular basis. On the eve of the Civil War, few detailed maps […]

Places in American Civil War History: Maps Depicting Prologue to War and Secession, March 1861

This is the first of a series of guest posts from Ed Redmond, Cartographic Specialist in the Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division, documenting the cartographic history of maps related to the American Civil War, 1861-1865. The posts will appear on a regular basis. The first post will provide on overview of pre-war mapping, […]

The Bob Crozier Collection: Aerial Reconnaissance in World War II

Today’s post is from Ryan Moore, a Cartographic Specialist in the Geography and Map Division. Bob Crozier served as a Technical Sergeant in the 654th Topographic Engineers from 1943 to 1946. Crozier was part of the American First Army under General Omar Bradley. He donated a collection of photos and maps created during World War […]

World War I: Understanding the War at Sea Through Maps

The following guest post is by Ryan Moore, a cartographic specialist in the Geography and Map Division. This blog post originally appeared in the Library of Congress Blog. Soldiers leaping from trenches and charging into an apocalyptic no man’s land dominate the imagination when it comes to World War I. However, an equally dangerous and […]

Celebrating Native American Cartography: The Catawba Deerskin Map

With the end of November and Native American Heritage Month, today we are taking a closer look at a unique map among the cartographic collections of the Geography and Map Division. Documenting just part of the expansive and diverse Native American experience is the “Map of the several nations of Indians to the Northwest of […]