This Week: Collecting, Women’s Day & Jazz Legends

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This Week at the Library:

Tuesday, 3/7, 12:00 pm – Obsession, Collection, Donation: Dayton C. Miller (Lecture)
Wednesday, 3/8, 2:00 pm – The Sounds of Feminist Revolution (Lecture)
Thursday, 3/9, 7:00 pm – Miles and Trane as Living Ancestors (Lecture)

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Flutes in the Dayton C. Miller Collection, 1928, as displayed in the home of Dr. Miller (Dayton C. Miller Collection)

Flutes in the Dayton C. Miller Collection, 1928, as displayed in the home of Dr. Miller (Dayton C. Miller Collection)

Tuesday, March 7, 2017 – 12:00 pm [Lecture]
Obsession, Collection, Donation:
Dayton C. Miller, An American Collector

Carol Lynn Ward-Bamford, Curator of Musical Instruments, Music Division
with special guest Paul Runci

It may be fair to say that Dayton C. Miller (1866-1941), a scientist by profession, a flutist and a collector above all), gradually developed the largest private collection ever assembled pertaining to one subject in the musical arts, with thousands of objects. Dayton Clarence Miller was born in Strongsville, Ohio, lived in nearby Cleveland, Ohio for his entire life, and served as professor in charge of physics at Case Western Reserve for 45 years. Dr. Miller described his collection as consisting of five separate collections:

I. Flutes
II. Books and literary materials relating to the flute
III. Music for the flute
IV. Works of art relating to the flute
V. Portraits of flutists and composers for the flute

Dr. Miller’s bequest typifies the relationship between collectors and museums where the donations of a private collector can educate and inspire the public in perpetuity. Who was this American collector who so strongly believed that the history of music was an essential part of the history of civilization that his flutes should be housed forever in a library?

Whittall Pavilion, Ground Floor, Thomas Jefferson Building
Free, tickets available

Wanted ad placed in the December 1924 issue of "The Flutist" by Dayton C. Miller (Dayton C. Miller Collection)

Wanted ad placed in the December 1924 issue of “The Flutist” by Dayton C. Miller (Dayton C. Miller Collection)

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Wednesday, March 8, 2017 – 2:00 pm [Lecture]
The Sounds of Feminist Revolution

Bonnie Morris, Historian

On International Women’s Day (March 8th) women’s history professor Bonnie Morris will present a lecture on the women’s music movement, and will explore rare materials and cultural changes introduced onstage by feminist and lesbian artists. This lecture complements the exhibit “Women’s Music: Feminist Sounds and Spaces,” now on display off the Great Hall North Agile Cases. Dr. Morris has taught women’s studies on the faculty of both Georgetown and George Washington universities for over twenty years and is the author of fifteen books, including three Lambda Literary Award finalists (Eden Built by Eves, Girl Reel, Revenge of the Women’s Studies Professor). She is the recipient of a 2016 D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities fellowship.

Pickford Theater, Third Floor, James Madison Memorial Building
Free, no tickets required
Presented by the Humanities and Social Sciences Division
Contact: Meg Metcalf, [email protected]

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Miles Davis, ca. Aug. 1947, by William P. Gottlieb (Music Division)

Miles Davis, ca. Aug. 1947, by William P. Gottlieb (Music Division)

Thursday, March 9, 2017 – 7:00 pm [Lecture]
Miles and Trane as Living Ancestors

Ingrid Monson, Library of Congress Jazz Scholar

Monson discusses the music and legacies of Miles Davis and John Coltrane. The Quincy Jones Professor of African American Music and interim Dean of Arts and Humanities at Harvard University, Monson is an award-winning author and scholar of jazz, African American music and the music of the African diaspora. Made possible by the Reva and David Logan Foundation.

Montpelier Room, Sixth Floor, James Madison Memorial Building
Free, tickets available

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