Happy Birthday to “Little Mozart”

The Music Division is home to some magnificent Mozart manuscripts, from his Violin Concerto No. 5 in A Major, K. 219, to a handwritten letter from 14 year-old Wolfgang to his sister Nannerl, to his revered Gran Partita. In addition to these (fully digitized!) Mozart manuscripts, our collections also feature reflections and commentary on the […]

Next Week: Musical Goodness Galore

Monday, January 23, 2017 – 8:00 pm [Concert] Pacifica Quartet with Jörg Widmann, clarinet The exuberant, Grammy-winning Pacifica joins forces with German composer and clarinetist Jörg Widmann, well-matched partners for the striking works you’ll hear in this concert. Widmann’s dramatic, sinister Jagdquartett is a grimly ironic scherzo channeling the intensity and chaos of the hunt, […]

Inauguration Music of Yesteryear

On Friday, January 20, 2017, the Presidential Inauguration will take place and the President-elect will officially begin his duties as the 45th President of the United States. As we prepare for this political ritual, I thought it might be interesting to share some examples of music composed for and about specific presidential inaugurations from long […]

In Memoriam: 2016

With 2016 drawing to a close, anxious music fans may worry that a year that has taken away so many legends may yet give us one more reason to mourn. Starting with the death of Natalie Cole on New Year’s Day, dozens of artists who have provided the soundtracks of our lives died this year. […]

Winter/Spring Ticket Release for Concerts from the Library of Congress

This post has been modified from an article originally written by Nicholas A. Brown. Tickets for winter and spring Concerts from the Library of Congress events, presented by the Music Division, will be released to the public on Jan. 4 at 10 a.m. via Eventbrite. All concerts, films and lectures are free but require advance […]

“Hark! The Herald Angels Sing”: An Illustrated History

“Hark! The Herald Angels Sing” is one of the most popular Christmas carols we hear during the holidays, and one with an especially interesting history involving four creative minds over the span of two centuries. While the history is well documented, source materials in the Library of Congress’s collections provide engaging illustrations detailing the evolution […]

Buried in Valhalla: Performing Arts Figures at Kensico Cemetery

A guest blog post by retired cataloger Sharon McKinley. While researching Geraldine Farrar a few years ago, I noticed that she is buried at Kensico Cemetery, located in Valhalla, New York. Coincidentally, my grandparents are there as well. Beyond the fact that having a cemetery in a place called Valhalla is a grand idea, Kensico […]

Music and the Law, Part 1

In the Muse is happy to cross post the following piece by Betty Lupinacci, Processing Section Head in the Law Library. Her blog post was originally published on the Law Library’s blog, In Custodia Legis: Law Librarians of Congress.   As much as I love Christmas carols, I’m usually tired of them by mid-December as […]

Andrew White: “Petey, Me and the Library of Congress”

The following is a guest blog by Andrew N. White III, a participant in the Library’s DC Jazz Project, a component of the 2016-2017 Library of Congress Jazz Scholars program. This program is made possible by the Reva and David Logan Foundation. White delivered a lecture-recital at the Library on November 3, 2016 (a video […]