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Thinking About Learning Braille Music? Part II

Continued from last week

An Introduction to Music for the Blind Student, Part II by Richard Taesch

While Bettye Krolick’s How to Read Braille Music: An Introduction is suitable for students who already know the basics of music and only need to learn how to decipher braille music symbols, Richard Taesch’s An Introduction to Music for the Blind Student is suitable for students who are just starting their music lessons. Taesch’s course is a combination of lessons in rudimentary music theory and braille music reading.

Phase one starts with the music readiness activities that prepare students for formal music lessons. These lessons focus on the aural component of music through singing and ear training (listening skills) before reading is introduced. The chapters that follow combine braille music reading, theory, ear training, singing and melodic dictation. This series is intended not only to teach the students to read braille music but to help them audiate, or hear the music they are reading in their head. The lessons include assignments in writing, singing, and playing on the keyboard using the accompanying exercise books. This series moves at a much quicker pace than average piano method books or other instrumental method books. I suspect that good effort will be required to master the concepts introduced in these books. However, the emphasis on listening and singing

Introduction to Music for the Bind Student Part I by Richard Taesch

skills will help build a solid musical foundation for students regardless of their chosen musical field of study.

Lastly, if you are looking for a quick introduction to gauge what’s involved in learning braille music, the Music Section has Who’s Afraid of Braille Music, a 20 page book written by Richard Taesch and William McCann for parents and students exploring braille music.

Now that you are familiar with these books, please contact us to check them out. For a sighted teacher or parent teaching a blind student, please ask for both the print and braille versions.

 

  • How to Read Braille Music: An Introduction by Bettye Krolick (LPM00638; BRM29811)
  • An Introduction to Music for the Blind Student by Richard Taesch:
    • Part I (LPM00662, v.1 -3; BRM34079, v. 1-4)*
    • Part II (LPM00664, v.1 & 2, BRM34080 v. 1-4)
  • Dictionary of Braille Music Signs, Revised Edition (BRM36087)
  • Dictionary of Braille Music Signs, First Edition (LPM00428)
  • Who’s Afraid of Braille Music: A Short Introduction and Resource Handbook for Parents and Students (LPM00660; BRM32949)

If you are a student thinking of studying music in college, we have great resources in addition to these books to help you become a fluent braille music reader. Please get in touch with us this summer.

*The Music Section has the first edition of the course. The Second Revised Edition is not yet available through NLS.

Thinking About Learning Braille Music? Part I

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This April marks the 100th anniversary of the United States’ entry into World War I. The Library of Congress is commemorating that significant anniversary with exhibits, publications, and other various activities. As part of this commemoration, the NLS Music Section was asked to provide braille music for blind visitors. While going through the collection, we […]