{ subscribe_url: '/share/sites/library-of-congress-blogs/navcc.php' }

Now Playing at the Packard Campus Theater (March 16-18, 2017)

 The following is a guest post by Jenny Paxson of the Library of Congress.

the-piano

The Piano (Miramax, 1993)

Thursday, March 16 (7:30 p.m.)
The Piano (Miramax, 1993, R-rated *)
One of the most highly acclaimed and hauntingly original motion pictures of the 1990s was written and directed by New Zealand-born Jane Campion, in her third feature film. Holly Hunter stars as Ada, a mute Scottish woman who is sold by her father into marriage to a New Zealand frontiersman named Alisdair Stewart (Sam Neill). Bringing her young daughter, Flora (Anna Paquin), and her cherished piano with her, Ada is devastated when Stewart refuses to transport the piano over the rough terrain to their home, and trades it to Baines (Harvey Keitel), a fellow settler who has adopted Maori ways. Ada is determined to get her most cherished possession back with devastating consequences. The film accumulated dozens of international awards including the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival and three Academy Awards:  Best Actress for Hunter, Best Supporting Actress for Paquin, and Best Original Screenplay for Campion. Michael Nyman’s score became a best-selling soundtrack album. *No one under the age of 17 will be admitted without a parent or guardian.

lost_in_translation_xxlg

Lost in Translation (Focus, 2003)

Friday, March 17 (7:30 p.m.)
Lost in Translation (Focus, 2003, R-rated *)
Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson star as two lonely Americans in Tokyo–a faded movie star there to make a beer commercial, and the young and neglected wife of a celebrity photographer, who develop an unlikely friendship as they deal with culture shock in Tokyo and commiserate about their unhappy lives. Sofia Coppola, who wrote, directed and produced the film, was nominated for Oscars in all three categories, winning for original screenplay. Bill Murray was also nominated for the Best Actor Oscar for his performance. *No one under the age of 17 will be admitted without a parent or guardian.

get-your-man

Get Your Man (Paramount, 1927)

Saturday, March 18 (7:30 p.m.)
Get Your Man (Paramount, 1927)
Trailblazing director Dorothy Arzner’s career in feature films spanned from the silent era of the late 1920s into the early 1940s. In fact, she was the only female director working in the United States in the 1930s. This charming romantic comedy was Arzner’s third feature at Paramount and stars the “It Girl,” Clara Bow, at the height of her fame. Bow plays a New York tourist in Paris who falls for a handsome nobleman (Buddy Rogers), who, as it turns out, was betrothed in childhood to the daughter of a neighboring marquis. Bow soon hatches a plan to overcome that obstacle and get her man. This print is a carefully pieced together restoration by the Library of Congress from rediscovered nitrate stock, stills and intertitles and is the most complete version of the film we are ever likely to get. Also on the program is the 1914 Keystone comedy short Mabel at the Wheel directed by and starring Mabel Normand. Live musical accompaniment will be provided by Andrew Simpson.

For more information on our programs, please visit the website at: www.loc.gov/avconservation/theater/.

 

Add a Comment

This blog is governed by the general rules of respectful civil discourse. You are fully responsible for everything that you post. The content of all comments is released into the public domain unless clearly stated otherwise. The Library of Congress does not control the content posted. Nevertheless, the Library of Congress may monitor any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove content for any reason whatever, without consent. Gratuitous links to sites are viewed as spam and may result in removed comments. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on the Library site. Read our Comment and Posting Policy.

Required fields are indicated with an * asterisk.