Baseball’s Spring Training

Jim Thorpe, New York NL, at Spring Training in Marlin Springs, Texas (Baseball). Photo published by Bain News Service, 1918. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.50300

Jim Thorpe, New York NL, at Spring Training in Marlin Springs, Texas (Baseball). Photo published by Bain News Service, 1918. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.50300

As I write this post on March 29th, Washington’s cherry trees have already bloomed . . . and gone . . . and another rite of spring has passed as well: baseball’s spring training! The 2012 Major League Baseball season commenced yesterday in Tokyo as the Seattle Mariners defeated the Oakland Athletics (who got their revenge by beating the Mariners today).

For a number of weeks, teams have been getting back in shape and re-sharpening their hitting, pitching, fielding, and base-running skills in warm-weather climes such as Florida and Arizona. Most of us, alas, didn’t have the opportunity to travel to witness this annual occurrence, but will have to judge our team’s prospects by what we read in the sports pages or witness at the ball park or on television.

Here’s hoping that this spring finds you renewed and ready and getting in touch with your innermost Jim Thorpe or Babe Ruth!

Learn More:

George Herman "Babe" Ruth, full length, standing, facing front; wearing baseball uniform; in field with hands on hips; other players in background.

Babe Ruth, King of Swat, at St. Petersburg, Florida. Stereograph copyrighted by Keystone View Co., 1930. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.18798

One Comment

  1. Jason Beard
    May 25, 2012 at 3:57 pm

    Those pics are great. My family and I will be in D.C. in the first week of August to visit. Can’t wait to see some more in person if possible.

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