A Window on Heritage and Home

This photograph of a shop window taken in 1942 speaks eloquently to what it means to have pride in both your heritage as well as in the country you’ve chosen as your home.

New York, New York. Window of a Jewish religious shop on Broom [sic] Street. Photo by Marjory Collins, 1942. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c31126

New York, New York. Window of a Jewish religious shop on Broom [i.e., Broome] Street. Photo by Marjory Collins, 1942. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c31126

New York, New York. Window of a Jewish religious shop on Broom [i.e. Broome] Street. Photo by Marjory Collins, 1942. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsa.8d21922

New York, New York. Window of a Jewish religious shop on Broom [i.e., Broome] Street. Photo by Marjory Collins, 1942. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsa.8d21922

Artifacts of the Jewish faith fill the window, studied carefully by a young girl. (Her gaze appears caught by the book entitled ‘The Romance of a People”.)

Even without reading the caption, a close look at the image tells the viewer we are peering into the window of a shop in the United States. The clue lies in the small banner at top left, which proclaims that the owners of this shop on the Lower East Side of Manhattan are “proud to be Americans”.

Another window (right), perhaps of the same shop, declares that “it’s great to be an American” and even offers advice on how to become a citizen of the United States.

Detail of http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsa.8d21922

Detail of http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsa.8d21922

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2 Comments

  1. John Flynn
    May 24, 2013 at 4:31 am

    This is a window on the world,our world and an example to follow. We have lost this art form and an ability to stop and stare.It is an interesting example of how we can reflect a culture and noble tradition as well as a pride that tells the world who we belong to if only like the girl we too could dwell to study and look back from without and go forward from within

  2. Chaya
    May 24, 2013 at 12:55 pm

    Beautiful. Thank you for this.

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