Tales of Football and Italian Americans: Two New Illustrated Books

Pictures help tell stories. Two new books published by the Library of Congress are full of hundreds of prints, posters, photographs and other illustrations drawn from the Library’s vast collections. Both books look back over hundreds of years of American history and tell their respective stories with passion – and pictures.

Football Nation: Four Hundred Years of America’s Game does just as the title suggests: it explores football in American history, from the Colonial era to today.  From backyard games to the 20th century pros, all aspects are explored – and illustrated. Players who changed the game, such as Red Grange (below), are featured as well. According to Football Nation, this photo shows Grange when his Chicago Bears were the visitors to Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C. on December 8, 1925.

"Red" Harold Grange. Photo by National Photo Company, Dec. 8, 1925. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/npcc.15254

“Red” Harold Grange. Photo by National Photo Company, Dec. 8, 1925. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/npcc.15254

Cover of <i>Football Nation: Four Hundred Years of America's Game</i>

Cover of Football Nation: Four Hundred Years of America’s Game

Explorers Emigrants Citizens: A Visual History of the Italian American Experience uses the Library of Congress collections to tell “the story of individuals, of families, of communities, of a people, of the Italians in America.” (p.10) It features more than 500 images covering 500 years of history.  There is more to the story of the smiling grocery store clerk, Charles Ruggiero (below), than first appears. Prominently displaying prices–a measure intended to control inflation–represented this Italian American’s patriotic contribution to fighting Mussolini during World War II.

Posting ceiling prices in foreign languages. Charles Ruggiero, clerk in a grocery store in New York's Italian section, wishes the handful of spaghetti he is breaking were Mussolini's neck. The ceiling price sign above his head, written in Italian, is helping to defeat Il Duce by controlling inflation, one of America's most dangerous enemies. Photo by Howard Liberman, July 1942. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsa.8b07443

Posting ceiling prices in foreign languages. Charles Ruggiero, clerk in a grocery store in New York’s Italian section, wishes the handful of spaghetti he is breaking were Mussolini’s neck. The ceiling price sign above his head, written in Italian, is helping to defeat Il Duce by controlling inflation, one of America’s most dangerous enemies. Photo by Howard Liberman, July 1942. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsa.8b07443

Explorers Emigrants Citizens

Cover of Explorers Emigrants Citizens: A Visual History of the Italian American Experience

Learn More:

Add a Comment

This blog is governed by the general rules of respectful civil discourse. You are fully responsible for everything that you post. The content of all comments is released into the public domain unless clearly stated otherwise. The Library of Congress does not control the content posted. Nevertheless, the Library of Congress may monitor any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove content for any reason whatever, without consent. Gratuitous links to sites are viewed as spam and may result in removed comments. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on the Library site. Read our Comment and Posting Policy.

Required fields are indicated with an * asterisk.