New Lesson Plans with a Global Perspective

Check out two new lesson plans from the Library of Congress.

The Alaska Purchase: Debating the Sale from Russian and U.S. Perspectives supports student use of primary sources from Russia and the U.S. to examine the respective Russian and American rationales for agreeing to the sale.

A Russian Settlement in Alaska: A Community at the Meeting of Frontiers invites students to explore Novo-Arkhangel’sk, which today is called Sitka, during the time that it was the administrative center for Russian possessions in North America.

Both lesson plans use primary sources from the Meeting of Frontiers, a bilingual, multimedia English-Russian digital library that tells the story of the American exploration and settlement of the West, the parallel exploration and settlement of Siberia and the Russian Far East, and the meeting of the Russian-American frontier in Alaska and the Pacific Northwest.

Let us know in the comments how you teach about places where the history of the United States overlaps that of other countries.


  1. eagle555ification
    January 17, 2012 at 8:59 am


  2. hermes
    January 17, 2012 at 9:00 am

    podemos analisar la historia referente,cartograficamente y podriamos cabiarlas a nivel mundial geopoliticamente haciendo otros calculos y medidas cartograficas yque pertenescan a america.

  3. Mary J Johnson
    January 18, 2012 at 12:33 pm

    I passed on this post to a group of teachers of talented and gifted students who attended a recent TPS workshop. They happened to be analyzing the famous check written for the purchase of Alaska, and they wanted more information. The resource links are perfect!

  4. Taylor Kendal
    January 20, 2012 at 2:17 pm

    Awesome global perspective! What exciting potential for inquiry when students see resources from the National Library of Russia.

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