Teacher Webinar Tuesday Oct 7 — Civil Rights Act of 1964: A Long Struggle for Freedom

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 transformed U.S. society, and its impact is still felt–and debated–today. Join education experts from the Library of Congress to explore the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the conditions that led to it, and its decades-long legacy. This webinar will discuss teaching ideas that allow educators to prompt critical analysis and informed debate by their students around the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Civil rights march on Washington, D.C. 1963 Aug. 28.  //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.03128

Civil rights march on Washington, D.C. 1963 Aug. 28.
//hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.03128

Join us in a webinar

On Tuesday, October 7, at 7 PM ET, staff from the Library will host a webinar that will engage participants in a model primary source analysis, facilitate a discussion about the power of primary sources for teaching about civil rights issues, and demonstrate how to find resources from Library of Congress.

Throughout the year, the Library will be hosting educator webinars every other Tuesday at 7:00 ET focusing on a variety of instructional strategies for using primary sources in instruction.  Check out the 2014 schedule and information about joining the webinar. In addition to the webinars, we will be hosting Hangouts with subject matter experts from around the Library. Watch this blog for reminders about upcoming events!

We hope you can join the webinar and share your insights! But for those who can’t join us for the live event or want to review it, the recording will be posted here.

Teaching resources

The Teaching with the Library of Congress blog wrote about the significance of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as well as select titles from the Act:

The Civil Rights Act of 1964, the conditions that led to it, and its decades-long legacy are the subjects of a powerful new teaching resource from the Library of Congress and HISTORY®, part of the Idea Book For Educators series titled “The Civil Rights Act of 1964: A Long Struggle for Freedom.” Inspired by the Library of Congress exhibition of the same name, the Idea Book presents unique primary sources from the Library’s collections that illuminate the unjust laws and practices that preceded the act. Much of the content from the blog posts above can also be found in the Idea Book.

The Idea Book is available from HISTORY® here – sign in required for download.

 

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