Don’t Believe Everything You Hear or Read

Mars Peopled by One Vast Thinking Vegetable! Salt Lake Tribune, October 13, 1912

Mars Peopled by One Vast Thinking Vegetable! Salt Lake Tribune, October 13, 1912

In the most recent “Right to the Source” column in NSTA’s magazine The Science Teacher, Michael Apfeldorf discusses reactions in the early 20th century to reports of life on Mars. He explains that as early as 1894, scientists noted that conditions on Mars would not support life, but wild theories persisted in popular media. That reminded us of the Library’s many April Fools’ Day posts featuring primary sources that should not be taken at face value.

Looking for other ways to help students analyze sources and evaluate information? Explore these resources for ideas.

Analyzing primary sources can help students become better critical thinkers who are willing to evaluate information and dig deeply to find the answers to questions.

How will you use primary sources to encourage students to look for the story behind the source?

 

 

Teachers: Ask Us Anything about the Rosa Parks Papers–Reddit AMA Tuesday, March 29 9am-12 ET

This Tuesday, teachers and school librarians will have an opportunity to ask Library of Congress experts about the Rosa Parks papers. A Reddit “Ask Me Anything” (AMA) session from 9 to 12 a.m. (ET) in the AskHistorians subreddit will include education specialists from the Library, as well as staff who organized and described the papers of this civil rights legend.

Integrating Historical and Geographic Thinking

The latest edition of The TPS Journal, an online publication created by the Library of Congress Educational Outreach Division in collaboration with the TPS Educational Consortium, explores how the five themes of geography can be applied to analyzing primary sources, providing students with multiple perspectives and contributing to greater understanding of a topic.