Free Teacher Webinar: Books Go to War

Soldiers receiving books

Victory Book Campaign. Soldiers of Fort Myer, Virginia, in Statuary Hall of the Capitol, receiving books donated by members of Congress for 1943 Victory Book Campaign

Join reference specialist Abby Yochelson, of the Library of Congress Humanities and Social Sciences Division, as she discusses “Books Go to War: Armed Services Editions in World War II” based on the Library’s  America Reads exhibition.

When the United States entered World War II in 1941, it opposed nations that had banned and burned books. In 1943, the Council on Books in Wartime, working with the War Department, began distributing pocket-size volumes to every theater of war. Approximately 123 million copies of 1,300 titles in every genre were printed and distributed. The program rescued from obscurity such now-classic books as F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. Betty Smith’s A Tree Grows in Brooklyn became a national favorite.

Today, the books are loved by collectors, and the Library of Congress Rare Book and Special Collections Division has the only complete set. Join us to learn more about this fascinating collection. Register today at //www.loc.gov/teachers/professionaldevelopment/webinar/.

Individuals requiring accommodations for this event are requested to submit a request at least five business days in advance by contacting (202) 707-6362 or [email protected]

Primary Sources for the Primary Grades: A Apple Pie

A Apple Pie, created and published in 1900, traces the destiny of an apple pie, using the alphabet and charming illustrations.

This delightful primary source, more than an alphabet recognition book, is superb to use with any grade. Look carefully at every illustration and you will see toys, clothing, and activities that will enhance a student’s understanding of a past time. Each page offers opportunities to create a variety of questions for further investigation.

Blessed with “Sunshine on a Cloudy Day”

When I learned that Smokey Robinson would be the next recipient of the Library of Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song, I was thrilled.

The Gershwin Prize honors a living musical artist’s lifetime achievement in promoting the genre of song as a vehicle of cultural understanding; entertaining and informing audiences; and inspiring new generations.

Discover and Explore: Online Conference Recordings Now Available

You may have heard that the Library hosted an online conference on October 25-26 called, “Discover and Explore with Library of Congress Primary Sources.” Education experts and subject matter specialists presented 15 different sessions discussing resources and teaching strategies for using primary sources in the classroom.

The event was a huge success! We served more than 800 educators through the live event and we expect that number to grow now that the recordings are available. For a limited time, you can still earn a certificate for each presentation you view.

Americanism: Two Perspectives Following the First World War

Following the Allied victory in World War I, the United States entered a period of rapid change, experiencing changes both in its stature as a global leader and changes from social experiments, including universal women’s suffrage and the prohibition of alcohol. One widely discussed topic of this time was “Americanism,” the idea that certain unique qualities, traditions, and ideals set apart the United States.