New Year’s Greetings from the Library of Congress Educational Outreach Office

For those of you who might dream of celebrating the New Year in Times Square, here is a wonderful poster by David Klein.

Fly TWA New York. David Klein, 1960

Fly TWA New York. David Klein, 1960

May the new year bring you peace and success. We at the Library look forward to sharing more teaching tips and primary sources with you.

6 Comments

  1. Fatima K. Hosein
    December 27, 2016 at 11:28 am

    Thanks very much for this beautiful post.

    I wish to all the members of Library of Congress Educational Outreach Office a wonderful Happy New year and a 2017 full of knowledge, happiness and success.

    Best Regards
    Fatima K. Hosein

  2. Uttam Dutta
    December 27, 2016 at 9:55 pm

    Wish Happy and Safe new year 2017 to all friends of Library of Congress
    Knowledge gives us freedom of mind and soul , and here all are committed to do so…

  3. MaryJane Cochrane
    December 30, 2016 at 12:35 pm

    Happy New Year and a thank you for all the good work you do.

  4. Sol Hernandez
    December 31, 2016 at 2:39 pm

    Best wishes for all the staff and families at the Library of Congress! Thank you for sharing your knowledge and educational expertise with us! Keep up your hard work!

  5. Sherri Silva
    January 1, 2017 at 8:30 am

    Happy New Year to all of you. Thank you for the resources that you provide and making them all student friendly. It truly allows our students to experience the past in light of the present.

  6. Mary Alice Anderson
    January 2, 2017 at 3:06 pm

    The colorful poster brought a huge smile to my face! A couple weeks ago I toured a 1950’s era home in my community. The current owners have preserved much of the past. A hallway connecting a rec area to the garage was wallpapered with 50’s era airline posters. Another hallway is papered with 1950’s children’s art work. Onebedroom has a stairway to a former bomb shelter filled with appropriate artifacts from 1954. The master bathroom is wall papered with professional theater playbills. Primary sources are all around us!

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