What is a Poet Laureate? Why is the Role Important?

The following guest post, part of our “Teacher’s Corner” series, is by Rebecca Newland, a Fairfax County Public Schools Librarian and former Teacher in Residence at the Library of Congress.

Poet Laureate of the United States Joy Harjo, June 6, 2019. Photo by Shawn Miller.

In June, Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden named Joy Harjo the 23rd Poet Laureate of the United States. On September 19, the date of her inaugural reading, Harjo will be officially installed in this role. This yearly (and sometimes biennial) event offers you the opportunity to begin discussing the significance of poetry with your students at the beginning of the school year.

Before sharing with students the history of the honor as well as the duties and responsibilities of the laureate, ask them to brainstorm a list of what they think a poet laureate does. Compare their ideas with the details provided in the history to see how close they came. You may wish to discuss with them some of the projects previous Poets Laureate have led during their terms. Examples include Billy Collins’s Poetry 180 and Natasha Trethewey’s Where Poetry Lives.

Engage students by asking why the Library of Congress has chosen “to raise the national consciousness to a greater appreciation of the reading and writing of poetry” by appointing a national Poet Laureate.

Extend the experience by asking students to investigate the ways in which other nations celebrate and raise consciousness, such as the Poet’s Corner in England’s Westminster Abbey.

Explore:

  • Do other nations have a poet laureate or equivalent position?
  • Do states or cities have a laureate?

Introducing the new poet laureate to your students is one way to start year-long discussions of poetry and the role it plays for individuals, classes, and nations.

How do you first bring poetry into your classroom or library?

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The following guest post, part of our “Teacher’s Corner” series, is by Rebecca Newland, a Fairfax County Public Schools Librarian and former Teacher in Residence at the Library of Congress. Just as watching or acting out a Shakespeare play enables students to access it in ways that reading alone cannot, imagine what insights students may […]

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The following guest post, part of our “Teacher’s Corner” series, is by Rebecca Newland, a Fairfax County Public Schools Librarian and former Teacher in Residence at the Library of Congress. The students I work with live in one of the most densely populated, bustling, suburban areas in the United States: Northern Virginia, just outside Washington, […]

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Beginning with Poetry

The following guest post, part of our “Teacher’s Corner” series, is by Rebecca Newland, a Fairfax County Public Schools Librarian and former Teacher in Residence at the Library of Congress. One way to show students the importance of poetry is to start sharing poems at the beginning of the school year, even perhaps on the […]