Finding “Where Poetry Lives”

Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey’s second-term project, “Where Poetry Lives,” has offered her the opportunity to see first-hand how poetry strengthens our communities. She has travelled from coast-to-coast and met people from different backgrounds and at different parts of their lives, all of whom connected to her and to each other through the art. I wrote […]

Kluge Center Spotlight: Arun Sood on Robert Burns

The following is a guest post by Jason Michael David Steinhauer, program specialist in the Library of Congress Office of Scholarly Programs. The John W. Kluge Center welcomes promising young scholars from the United Kingdom to conduct research at the Library of Congress. The scholars—all currently pursuing doctorate degrees—are funded by the Arts and Humanities […]

In Praise of Detective Peter, or How We Get By With a Little Help from Our Friends

The following is a guest post by Abby Yochelson, English and American Literature Reference Specialist at the Library of Congress’s Main Reading Room. Peter Armenti, frequent blogger here and a wonderful reference librarian, has dazzled a collection of literary librarians across the country. As the current cliché goes, he thinks outside the box to great […]

Poetry in the School Library

The following is a guest post by Rebeca Newland, the Teacher in Residence at the Library of Congress for 2013-14. Most students leave high school having studied Shakespeare, the howls of Beowulf and Grendel in battle, and a smattering of American poets. Beyond the study of canonical poems and poets, how can we foster a […]

W. H. Auden and Benjamin Britten

On Friday, one of our sister blogs, the Music Division’s In the Muse, marked the hundredth birthday of British composer Benjamin Britten. Highlighting some of Music Division’s important Britten holdings, the post references a recording of Britten’s collaborator Peter Pears reciting W. H. Auden’s sonnet “The Composer” as part of a 1980 program at the […]