‘O Captain! My Captain!’ Walt Whitman, Two Centuries Later

The following post was written by Neely Tucker, a writer-editor in the Library’s Office of Communications. It originally appeared on the Library of Congress Blog. Walt Whitman, that most exuberant of poets, the 19th century bard of transcendent sensitivity, sensuousness and epic vision, was given to intimate correspondence in his personal life, too. As the […]

Starting from Paumanok/Proto-Leaf: Happy 200th Birthday, Walt Whitman!

The following guest post is by Barbara Bair, historian in the Library’s Manuscript Division. This is the third in a series of blog posts exploring the life and work of Walt Whitman. The Library of Congress will celebrate the 200th anniversary of Whitman’s birthday in spring 2019 with a series of exhibits, public programs, and a […]

The Evolution of Walt Whitman’s “O Captain! My Captain!”

The following post was written by Cheryl Lederle, Barbara Bair, and Victoria Van Hyning of the Library of Congress. It originally appeared on the Teaching with the Library of Congress blog. The Library of Congress will celebrate the 200th anniversary of Whitman’s birthday in spring 2019 with a series of exhibits, public programs, and a digital crowdsourcing […]

My Sprig of Lilac

The following guest post is by Barbara Bair, historian in the Library’s Manuscript Division. This is the second in a series of blog posts exploring the life and work of Walt Whitman. The Library of Congress will celebrate the 200th anniversary of Whitman’s birthday in spring 2019 with a series of exhibits, public programs, and a […]

Wound Dressing: Walt Whitman in Washington

The following guest post is by Barbara Bair, historian in the Library’s Manuscript Division. This is the first in a series of blog posts exploring the life and work of Walt Whitman. The Library of Congress will celebrate the 200th anniversary of Whitman’s birth with events and exhibits in May and June (to be announced). […]

Reading Whitman

The following guest post was written by Barbara Bair, historian in the Library’s Manuscript Division. In this month celebrating the work of poets, we can honor Walt Whitman—the poet of democracy and nature, of sexuality and modernity, of globalism, nationalism, and mysticism—as both the people’s poet and the poet’s poet. The Library of Congress’s recent […]

Walt Whitman’s Wartime Experience: Using Primary Sources to Offer Context

The following guest post, part of our “Teacher’s Corner” series, is by Rebecca Newland, a Fairfax County Public Schools Librarian and former Teacher in Residence at the Library of Congress. Using primary sources in conjunction with reading poetry is a way to help students build context for understanding a poet’s time and place. Walt Whitman’s […]

Poetic Reactions to Historical Events

The following guest post, part of our “Teacher’s Corner” series, is by Rebecca Newland, a Fairfax County Public Schools Librarian and former Teacher in Residence at the Library of Congress. Like writers of fiction and non-fiction, poets use their work as a forum for social commentary. Often this commentary is directly related to historical events […]

Two Walt Whitman Collections Added to Library’s Website

The Library of Congress holds the largest archival collection of Walt Whitman materials in the world. These materials are primarily housed in the Library’s Manuscript Division and its Rare Book & Special Collections Division. In May, two of the Manuscript Division’s Whitman collections were made available on the Library’s website. First, the Thomas Biggs Harned […]