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Category: Copyright

Meet Sarah Beth Morgan: An Animation Artist Drawn to Purpose

Posted by: Ashley Tucker

The Copyright Office celebrates Women’s History Month and this year’s theme, “Women who advocate for equity, diversity, and inclusion.” As part of this year’s celebration, Copyright Office staff sat down with Sarah Beth Morgan, an animation director, illustrator, and muralist who has practiced art across the country. Morgan attended Savannah College of Art and Design …

Hands typing on a laptop keyboard next to a blue, green, and black background of servers and 0s and 1s; text reads: Looking Forward: The U.S. Copyright Office's AI Initiative in 2024

Looking Forward: The U.S. Copyright Office’s AI Initiative in 2024

Posted by: Nora Scheland

This blog post previews the next steps of the U.S. Copyright Office’s comprehensive initiative to examine the copyright implications of the current forms of generative AI and shares highlights from a recent copyright and AI initiative update letter to Congress from Register of Copyrights Shira Perlmutter.

Background looks like a brown wooden table. On it, are two beige parchments showing early Copyright laws. On the right are two photographs with white frames around them. One is black and white and shows people working in a file room. The other is a color photograph of an aerial view of the Jefferson and Madison buildings on Capitol Hill

New Learning Engine Video Highlights the History of Copyright

Posted by: Nora Scheland

This blog post introduces the U.S. Copyright Office’s newest Learning Engine video, “History of Copyright,” which chronicles the history of copyright and the Copyright Office. The Office has released the video, and this blog post, timed with the 234th anniversary of the Congressional bill that eventually became the first federal copyright law.

A small person looks at a large book with images representing Black history.

Celebrating African Americans and the Arts: The Color Purple

Posted by: Alison Hall

This year’s Black History Month theme of Celebrating African Americans and the Arts recognizes the impact of Black artists and their creations as well as the significant role of copyright in creative industries. As part of this year’s celebration, we reflect on the legacy of Alice Walker and her book The Color Purple.

1928 over an hourglass breaking with musical notes and film

Lifecycle of Copyright: 1928 Works in the Public Domain

Posted by: Alison Hall

Every year on January 1, a new class of creative works enters the public domain in the United States. This year, a variety of works published in 1928, ranging from motion pictures to music to books, joined others in the public domain. The public domain has important historical and cultural benefits in the lifecycle of copyright. Here we highlight a selection of works entering the public domain in 2024.

Two pink registration application cards set against a blurred background of a bookshelf in an office suite. Text reads: Over One Million Card Catalog Records Digitized in Copyright Public Records System Pilot, A Copyright: Creativity at Work Blog Post

Over One Million Card Catalog Records Digitized in Copyright Public Records System Pilot

Posted by: Nora Scheland

This summer, the Copyright Office reached a new milestone in our modernization efforts: one million card catalog records have been digitized with searchable metadata and added to the Office’s Copyright Public Records System (CPRS) pilot. Learn more about CPRS, the Office’s digitization efforts, and historical registration application cards in this blog post.

Image styled like a section of microfilm, showing silhouettes of four young individuals standing in the streets of a deserted town.

Native American Heritage Month Highlight: Reservation Dogs

Posted by: Nicole Lamberson

During Native American Heritage Month, we celebrate the richness of Native American culture and its diverse array of creative expression. The U.S. Copyright Office’s records contain thousands of submissions from Native American creators in various artistic forms, including film, television, music, literature, and documents. Here we highlight the television series Reservation Dogs.

Blue background with legal icons (gavel, check mark, scales of justice, document with check mark). Text reads: Copyright Claims Board CCB.gov #CASEAct

Checking in with the Copyright Claims Board Nearly Eighteen Months After Opening Day

Posted by: Nora Scheland

As we approach the eighteen-month mark for the Copyright Claims Board (CCB), we revisit a conversation with the CCB's three Copyright Claims Officers, David Carson, Monica McCabe, and Brad Newberg, from the one-year anniversary and share updated statistics about the Board's work between June 2022 and October 2023.

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Our Summer of Artificial Intelligence: Copyright Office Hosts Two Webinars on Copyright and AI

Posted by: Nora Scheland

In June and July 2023, the Copyright Office hosted two public virtual webinars on the use of artificial intelligence technologies to generate works in creative fields. This blog post provides a brief recap of and links to the webinars, which focused on copyright registration guidance for AI-generated works and perspectives on how AI impacts copyright systems across the globe.