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Archive: 2016 (33 Posts)

Two full-length photos of a bearded man dressed in Ottoman attire.

The Faith of Far Away Moses: Yom Kippur, 1893

Posted by: Stephen Winick

Note: This is part of a series of posts about Far Away Moses, a fascinating celebrity of the 19th century, who served as the model for one of the keystone heads on the Thomas Jefferson Building.  Moses, a Sephardic Jew from Constantinople, knew some of the most prominent Americans of his era, including Theodore Roosevelt …

A man playing a guitar and singing to a close crowd of a dozen or so men and women

More about “The Dodger”: New Evidence about one of Aaron Copland’s “Old American Songs”

Posted by: Stephen Winick

Note: this is the second in a series of posts about a classic item from the AFC archive, “The Dodger.” [See the first post here.] [See the second post here.][See the third post here.] Second note: we’ve also created a podcast version of these stories. Download our “Dodger” podcast here! In this post, I’ll present …

A man playing a guitar and singing to a close crowd of a dozen or so men and women

The Candidate’s a Dodger: An Electoral Folksong from Oral Tradition to Aaron Copland

Posted by: Stephen Winick

Note: this is the first in a series of posts about a classic item from the AFC archive, “The Dodger.” [See the first post here.] [See the second post here.][See the third post here.] Second note: we’ve also created a podcast version of these stories. Download our “Dodger” podcast here! As Election Day draws near, …

The Folklore of Far Away Moses

Posted by: Stephen Winick

The Face of Far Away Moses People who have come to visit our research center in the beautiful Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress may have noticed the interesting faces that adorn its exterior. Known as the “ethnological heads” or “keystone heads,” the faces were intended to demonstrate the different characteristics of the …

A man playing a guitar and singing to a close crowd of a dozen or so men and women

AFC Symposium Next Week–September 12 & 13

Posted by: Stephen Winick

As part of its ongoing 40th Anniversary celebrations, the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress will present “Collections, Collaborations & Connections,” a free public symposium here at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. The panels will highlight the Center’s unparalleled collections, explore innovative approaches to cultural documentation, and focus on current best …

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More Treasures from the Izzy Young Collection

Posted by: Stephen Winick

This is a guest post by Maya Lerman, processing archivist at the American Folklife Center. She is writing occasional guest posts as she makes discoveries during the processing of the Izzy Young Collection.  Her first post on the collection can be found here. The Izzy Young Collection documents the folk revival of the late 1950s …

A man playing a guitar and singing to a close crowd of a dozen or so men and women

Five Questions with Jennifer Cutting

Posted by: Stephen Winick

The following is a guest post by Jennifer Cutting.  The “Five Questions” interview was performed by Danna Bell, from the Library of Congress’s Educational Outreach office.  A shorter version of her answers is available at their blog, Teaching with the Library of Congress. Describe what you do at the Library of Congress and the materials …

A man playing a guitar and singing to a close crowd of a dozen or so men and women

“Oral Tradition” on the Walls of the Jefferson Building

Posted by: Stephen Winick

The following is a guest post by Jennifer Cutting.  A longtime member of the AFC Staff, Jennifer is also a trained docent and leads fascinating tours of the Library’s Thomas Jefferson Building.  Her post is part of a series of blog posts about the 40th Anniversary Year of the American Folklife Center. Visit this link …

A man playing a guitar and singing to a close crowd of a dozen or so men and women

The American Folklife Center: 40 Years of Change

Posted by: Stephen Winick

The following post is part of a series of blog posts about the 40th Anniversary Year of the American Folklife Center. Visit this link to see them all! This year the Library’s American Folklife Center (AFC) turns 40. Detailed histories of AFC are available elsewhere [1], so we thought we’d do something different in this …