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Homegrown At Home 2022 Is Underway!

In this photo of Pamyua, three men leap in the air, dressed in a combination of indigenous Alaskan garb and streetwear. Photo is accompanied by the Homegrown 2022 logo, which includes the words "Library of Congress American Folklife Center Homegrown 2022 Concert Series, "Homegrown at Home."

Pamyua. Photo courtesy of the artists.

Here at the American Folklife Center, we’re busy working on the 2022 Homegrown at Home Concert Series. The series kicked off on April 20 with a great concert by Kongero, a Swedish vocal group made up of four women who adorn traditional Swedish songs with harmonies and arrangements created by the band members. Kongero’s polyphonic music is characterized by tight harmonies, stirring rhythms, and the clarity of their beautiful voices.  I was also privileged to interview the singers, and the interview video is embedded with the concert.

Just like last year, these concert videos, recorded at home by the artists, will be presented online every other Wednesday starting at noon (Eastern U.S. Time Zone). But we’ve adjusted the format: rather than streaming them on Facebook, we are presenting them as “Homegrown Plus Premiere” blog posts here on the Folklife Today blog. We’ll simultaneously make them live on their own pages at the Library of Congress website, which you can find through the Folklife Concerts page at this link, and over at the Library of Congress YouTube channel, at this link. Finally, we’ll deploy a post over on our Facebook page, with a link to the concert. All of this will be done at noon on concert day by AFC staff and our great colleagues in other divisions of the Library of Congress.

 

In this photo of Swedish singing group Kongero, four women stand in front of a red tile roof. Photo is accompanied by the Homegrown 2022 logo, which includes the words "Library of Congress American Folklife Center Homegrown 2022 Concert Series, "Homegrown at Home." Photo: Linda Rós Guðnadotter

Anna Wikénius, Emma Björling, Sofia Hultqvist Kott, and Lotta Andersson are Kongero: Swedish Folk’appella.

If you’re a blog subscriber, you’ll get an email when each concert premieres. If you’re not a subscriber, why not subscribe now, by adding your email address at this link?

If you missed the first concert, don’t worry! Our premieres stay up in perpetuity, so you can still watch the concert and interview. If you want to catch up on the season at any time, the full list of our recent concerts which premiered on the blog is here.

In this photo of Herb Ohta, Jr., he plays a ukulele. Photo is accompanied by the Homegrown 2022 logo, which includes the words "Library of Congress American Folklife Center Homegrown 2022 Concert Series, "Homegrown at Home."

Herb Ohta, Jr. Photo courtesy of the artist.

The next concert in the series will be on May 4: Herb Ohta, Jr.: `Ukulele Virtuoso from Hawai’i.

We’re still booking the 2022 series, so not all the concerts can be announced–but a list of most of them is below. You can always find an up-to-date listing of everything we can announce at the Folklife Concerts page at this link.

Below find the list of concerts, with links to artist bios where available.

In this photo of Janusz Prusinowski Kompania, four men play musical instruments. Photo is accompanied by the Homegrown 2022 logo, which includes the words "Library of Congress American Folklife Center Homegrown 2022 Concert Series, "Homegrown at Home."

Janusz Prusinowski Kompania. Photo courtesy of the artists.

Remember: you can always find the up-to-date list at the Library of Congress Folklife Concerts Page, which you can find at this link.

We’re excited about this year’s lineup, and we hope you’ll tune to all these great concerts throughout the season!

 

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