An International Christmas Quiz

Merry Christmas, Joyeux Noël, Sheng Dan Kuai Le, ¡Feliz Navidad! Christmas celebrations take place around the world and can vary greatly from country to country with traditions that reflect differing cultural history and national customs. Test your knowledge and learn more about how this holiday is celebrated around the globe!

Detail from a newspaper of an article and image with the headline "Christmas Customs in Other Lands." The drawn image below the headline features three male figures dressed in historical costume holding musical instruments.

“Christmas Customs in Other Lands,” Evening Star (Washington, DC), December 20, 1931.

Detail from a 1910 newspaper of a collage of 5 images. Images clockwise: image 1 (top left) - 2 sail boats on the water in a bay; image 2 (center) groups of people a top bob sleds pushing their way down a mountain; image 3 (top right) - a larger liner ship in rough seas with a row boat in the foreground; image 4 (bottom right) - a male figure jumping in the air, hovering above a toboggan in the air which will land in the ground of a mountain; image 5 (bottom left) - a scene of many different people ice skating. The headline above the images says "Christmas Scenes Gathered Here from Many Lands."

“Christmas Scenes Gathered Here from Many Lands,” New York Tribune (New York, NY), December 25, 1910.

QUESTIONS

  1. Sprinkling yule logs with red wine is one of this country’s Christmas Eve traditions.
  2. Eel is a traditional part of a seafood-centric Christmas Eve meal in this country.
  3. Christmas was banned in this island country from 1969 to 1998.
  4. In the capital city of this South American country, there is a tradition of people roller skating to early morning church services between December 16-24.
  5. Christmas trees in the western part of this Eastern European country are often decorated with artificial spider webs because of the story of The Christmas Spider.
  6. Fortunetelling at Christmas celebrations is a tradition of this former Eastern Bloc country.
  7. Christmas has only been widely celebrated in this country for the last few decades as a non-religious holiday and Kentucky Fried Chicken is the popular choice for a Christmas Eve meal.
  8. The Wren boys (or girls!) procession is a very old tradition that takes place on St. Stephen’s Day in this country.
  9. The people of this country believe that Santa Claus, or Father Christmas, lives in the country’s northern part called Korvatunturi (or Lapland), north of the Arctic Circle
  10. During the time when this country was under communist control after WWII, the government did not like St. Nicholas or Santa Claus, so they created their own version that translates to “Grandfather Frost” or “Christmas Brother,” who came on New Year’s Eve.
  11. This country celebrates Las Posadas on Christmas Eve to commemorate the journey that Joseph and Mary made from Nazareth to Bethlehem in search of a safe refuge for the birth of baby Jesus. 
  12. This country’s culinary traditions include serving 12 dishes meant to give good luck for the next 12 months. For Catholics, it’s meant to reflect the number of Apostles.
  13. Mummering is a tradition that mainly takes place in a province of this country, where people dress up in costumes and knock on someone’s door and say in a disguised voice, “Are there any Mummers in the night?” or “Any Mummers ‘loud in?”
  14. This country’s folk tradition has it that mischievous Kallikantazari, or hobgoblins, rise from the underground to wreak havoc during the 12 days of Christmas. To make sure they disappear, priests travel to homes on the day of the Epiphany, January 6, and bless them with holy water. 
  15. In this country, December 25 is a public holiday, but in memory of Mohammed Ali Jinnah, the country’s founder.
  16. Straw is a traditional decoration in this country. It is normally spread on the table top and then covered with a clean, white tablecloth. 
  17. One of the most famous Christmas carols, “Silent Night,” was written in this country in 1818.
  18. Although Christmas isn’t widely celebrated in this country, a winter solstice festival called “Yalda Night” or “Chelleh Night” is celebrated on the darkest day of the year (between December 20-22).
  19. Instead of just one Santa, this country is visited by thirteen “Yule Lads.”
  20. The roots of the strange modern tradition of the “Christmas Pickle” ornament in the U.S. has been attributed to this country, although most people in said country have never heard of the Christmas Pickle!
A detail of an image from a 1915 newspaper featuring Santa Claus driving his sleigh full of presents with two reindeer pulling it featured in the foreground. The title below the image says "Christmas Cheer."

Brownsville Herald (Brownsville, TX), December 24, 1915.

ANSWERS
*
Flag images found here.

  1. Sprinkling yule logs with red wine is one of this country’s Christmas Eve traditions.
    An image of the flag of France. France –
    Joyeux Noël! On Christmas Eve, a log is brought into the home and sprinkled with red wine to make it smell nice when burning. It is customary to leave the log and candles burning all night with some food and drinks left out in case Mary and the baby Jesus come past during the night. If you said Italy, you would be right too. In the past, yule logs were blessed, decorated with candles, sprinkled with wine or milk, or covered in oil, honey or butter, and were set ablaze by the head of the family.

    Detail of text of an article from a 1947 newspaper describing how Yule logs in France are anointed with wine.

    “Yule Log Custom Steeped in Old Superstitions,” Roanoke Rapids Herald (Roanoke Rapids, NC), December 18, 1947.

  2. Eel is a traditional part of a seafood-centric Christmas Eve meal in this country. 
    An image of flag of Italy. Italy – Buon Natale! In many parts of Italy, eel is served as part of Christmas Eve dinner (La Vigilia di Natale), particularly in the southern Italian town of Naples. It often makes an appearance as part of the Italian-American Feast of the Seven Fishes as well.

    Detail of text of an article from a 1947 newspaper which describes Christmas day in Italy.

    “Christmas in Foreign Lands,” Laurel Outlook (Laurel, MT), December 24, 1947.

  3. Christmas was banned in this island country from 1969 to 1998.
    An image of the flag of Cuba. Cuba – ¡Feliz Navidad! In 1969, then Cuban leader, Fidel Castro, banned Christmas altogether for two reasons: 1) Cuba was officially an atheist nation and 2) so that celebrations would not interfere with the sugar harvest. The ban lasted for nearly 30 years until a planned visit from Pope John Paul II to Havana in January 1998. In anticipation of the Pope’s visit, Castro declared that for one year only, Christmas would be a public holiday. The change, however, stuck and Christmas became permanent.

    Detail of an article from a 1998 newspaper which includes an image of three females, the one in the center holding a small Christmas tree, standing in front of a large box camera on a tripod. The headline reads "In Cuba, the Grinch Takes a Holiday."

    “In Cuba, the Grinch Takes a Holiday,” New York Times (New York, NY), December 20, 1998, p. WK3.

  4. In the capital city of this South American country, there is a tradition of people roller skating to early morning church services between December 16-24.
    An image of the flag of Venezuela. Venezuela – ¡Feliz Navidad!
    Going to Midnight Mass (Misas de Aguinaldo) is very popular and there are many other masses and church services in the days leading up to Christmas. In the capital city of Caracas, there’s a tradition of people roller skating to the early morning church services from December 16-24. Roads are often closed to traffic by 8 a.m. to make way for people to skate!

    Detail image of text from an article in a 1965 newspaper describing what Christmas in Venezuela is like. The headline reads "Venezuelan Christmas Like July 4."

    “Venezuelan Christmas Like July 4,” The Hartford Courant (Hartford, CT), December 15, 1965, p. 21.

  5. Christmas trees in the western part of this Eastern European country are often decorated with artificial spider webs because of the story of The Christmas Spider.
    Image of the flag of Ukraine. Ukraine – Різдвом Христовим!
    The Legend of the Christmas Spider is an Eastern European folktale which explains the origin of tinsel on Christmas trees. It is most prevalent in Western Ukraine, where small ornaments in the shape of a spider web are traditionally a part of the Christmas decorations. These are made of paper and silver wire called “pavuchky,” meaning “little spider.”

    Detail image of text from an article in a 1928 newspaper which describes the story of the Christmas Spider.

    “Christmas Feasting, Manners, Customs Traced Through Ages,” Evening Star (Washington, DC), December 23, 1928.

  6. Fortunetelling at Christmas celebrations is a tradition of this former Eastern Bloc country.
    Image of the flag of Russia. Russia – C рождеством! Orthodox Christmas in Russia is normally celebrated on January 7. The fortnight following is believed to be the best time to try age-old methods to predict the future during the Christmas holidays. January 6 (Christmas Eve) through January 19 (Russian Orthodox Epiphany) is considered the time period for the most accurate predictions.
    Traditionally, fortunetelling was performed by young, unmarried women; married women and men were not allowed to take part in fortunetelling rituals. Instead, older women performed word-based rituals designed to bring prosperity to their families. In today’s Russia, many fortunetelling customs involve the whole family. Tarot cards, tea leaf reading, and coffee grounds divination are common.

    Similar Christmas fortunetelling traditions exist throughout the historical region of Bohemia.

    Detail image of text from an article in a 1913 newspaper with the headline "Christmas Fortune Telling," that describes fortune telling practices in Bohemia during Christmastime.

    “Christmas Fortune Telling,” Golden Valley Chronicle (Beach, ND), December 19, 1913.

  7. Christmas has only been widely celebrated in this country for the last few decades as a non-religious holiday and Kentucky Fried Chicken is the popular choice for a Christmas Eve meal.
    Image of the flag of Japan. Japan –
    Meri Kurisumasu! Fried chicken is often eaten at Christmastime. It is the busiest time of year for restaurants such as Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) and people can place their orders at fast food restaurants in advance! There was an advertising campaign by KFC in 1974 called “Kentucky for Christmas!” (Kurisumasu ni wa kentakkii!) which was very successful and has been credited for making KFC popular for Christmas.

    Detail image of an article from a 1991 newspaper with the headline "Love and Chicken Fill Christmas Even in Very Merry Japan," that describes what Christmas is like in Japan.

    “Love and Chicken Fill Christmas Eve In Very Merry Japan,” Wall Street Journal (New York, NY), December 17, 1991, p. A1.

  8. The Wren boys (or girls!) procession is a very old tradition that takes place on St. Stephen’s Day in this country.
    Image of the flag of Ireland. Ireland – Nollaig shona dhuit!
    The Wren, sometimes pronounced wran, takes place every year on December 26, St. Stephen’s Day. The tradition goes back to ancient times when a real wren (bird) was killed and carried around in a holly bush, but in modern processions, no wrens are hunted or used. The Wren boys (or girls) dress up in old clothes and painted faces; in some parts of the country, they also wear straw hats. They travel from house to house carrying a long pole with a holly bush tied to its top, singing, dancing and playing music. Sometimes they are accompanied by violins, accordions, harmonicas and horns. The Wren boys procession mostly died out in the early 20th century, although it is a well-maintained tradition in certain parts of the country, particularly in some small towns including Dingle, in Country Kerry in the South West of Ireland.

    Detail image of text from an article in a 1909 newspaper that describes the practice of Wren Processions in Ireland.

    “Myths, Customs and Superstitions of New Year’s Day,” The Citizen (Berea, KY), December 30, 1909.

  9. The people of this country believe that Santa Claus, or Father Christmas, lives in the country’s northern part called Korvatunturi (or Lapland), north of the Arctic Circle.
    Image of the flag of Finland. Finland – Hyvää joulua!
    If you grew up in the United States, Santa Claus lives in the North Pole. But many people across the Atlantic believe that Santa Claus, or Father Christmas, lives in Finnish Lapland. People from all over the world send letters to Santa Claus in Finland. There is a big tourist theme park called “Christmas Land” in the north of Finland, near to where it is said Father Christmas lives.

    Detail image and text from an article in a 1949 newspaper. The image at the top features 3 figures: Santa in the middle with a boy at the left of him and a girl at the right of him. Above them is the headline "Spirit of Santa Claus. Below the image is text that describes how children in Lapland, Finland believe Santa dresses.

    “Spirit of Santa Claus,” The Bluffton News (Bluffton, OH), December 22, 1949.

  10. During the time when this country was under communist control after WWII, the government did not like St. Nicholas or Santa Claus, so they created their own version that translates to “Grandfather Frost” or “Christmas Brother,” who came on New Year’s Eve.
    Image of the flag of Serbia. Serbia – Христос се роди! People in Serbia also celebrate St. Nicholas’ Day, but on December 19. During the time when Serbia was controlled by a communist government, St. Nicholas, or Santa Claus replaced with their own version called Grandfather Frost (Дедa Мрaз / Deda Mraz), who came on New Year’s Eve. This is similar to the Russian version of Santa Claus called Ded Moroz. Traditional Serbian customs have also mixed with western customs. For example, people also have Christmas trees but they are decorated on New Year’s Eve, not at Christmas!

    Detail image of text from a 1951 newspaper that describes the Russian Santa Claus "Ded Moroz."

    “Christmas is Celebrated the World Over,” The Key West Citizen (Key West, FL), December 21, 1951.

  11. This country celebrates Las Posadas on Christmas Eve to commemorate the journey that Joseph and Mary made from Nazareth to Bethlehem in search of a safe refuge for the birth of baby Jesus.
    Image of the flag of Mexico. Mexico – ¡Feliz Navidad! Las Posadas is a religious festival
    between December 16 and 24, which commemorates the journey that Joseph and Mary made from Nazareth to Bethlehem. Children often perform the Posada processions, of which there are nine. Posada derives from the Spanish word for lodging. Houses are decorated with evergreens, moss and paper lanterns. In each Posada, children are given candles and a board with painted clay figures of Mary riding on a donkey and Joseph, and proceed through the streets. They call at the houses of friends and neighbors and sing a song at each home, a song about Joseph and Mary asking for a room in the house, but the children are told that there is no room in the house and that they must leave. Eventually they are told there is room and are welcomed in! When the children go into the house they say prayers of thanks and then they have a party with food, games and fireworks. Each night a different house holds the Posada party. At the final Posada, on Christmas Eve, a manger and figures of shepherds are put on the board. When the Posada house has been found, a baby Jesus is put into the manger and then families go to a midnight church service. After the service, there are more fireworks to celebrate the start of Christmas. Christmas Eve is known as “Noche Buena” and is a family day. People often take part in the final Posada and then in the evening have the main Christmas meal.

    Detail image of an article from a 1910 newspaper with the headline "Christmas in Old Mexico." Included with the article is an image of a figure dressed in a white robe-type garment with a crown on their head.

    “Christmas in Old Mexico,” The Pensacola Journal (Pensacola, FL), December 18, 1910.

  12. This country’s culinary traditions include serving 12 dishes meant to give good luck for the next 12 months. For Catholics, it’s meant to reflect the number of Apostles.
    Image of the flag of Poland. Poland – Wesolych Swiat!
    Poland is a largely Catholic country and Christmas Eve, known as Wigilia (pronounced vee-GHEE-lee-uh), is a very important and busy day. Traditionally, it was a day of fasting and abstinence (not eating anything) and meat is not normally allowed to be eaten in any form. The main Christmas meal is eaten in the evening and is called “Kolacja wigilijna” (Christmas Eve supper). It’s customary that no food is eaten until the first star is seen in the sky, so children look at the night sky to spot the first one! Looking for the first star is also a reminder of the Wisemen who followed a star to visit Jesus. The 12 dishes served are meant to give good luck for the next 12 months and for Catholics, the 12 dishes symbolize the 12 disciples of Jesus. The traditionally meatless meal serves as a reminder of the animals who took the baby Jesus in the manger. Everyone is expected to try some of each dish.If you said Lithuania or Western Ukraine, you would be on the right track. These areas share similar Christmas traditions as Poland, such as the 12 dishes, as well as an extra plate and seat are always left at the table. According to folk beliefs, the spirits of the departed members of the family visit on Christmas Eve.

    Detail image of an article from a 1984 newspaper. The image at the top features 3 figures; a women in a white blouse (middle) is serving food to 2 men seated on either side of her at a dinner table full of dishes. Below the image is text describing the Polish Christmas Eve dinner tradition.

    “Christmastime in the City,” Chicago Tribune (Chicago, IL), December 20, 1984, p. F1.

  13. Mummering is a tradition that mainly takes place in a province of this country, where people dress up in costumes and knock on someone’s door and say in a disguised voice, “Are there any Mummers in the night?” or “Any Mummers ‘loud in?”
    Image of the flag of Canada. Canada – Merry Christmas! Mummering is a tradition which mainly takes place in the province of Newfoundland, and is practiced more commonly in small towns and villages rather than large towns and cities. It’s also sometimes called “Jannying.” People dress up in costumes and knock on someone’s door and speak in a disguised voice. Then they sing and dance and have Christmas cake and a cup of something nice before moving on to the next house. In some places, if the host does not guess who the Mummers are, the host must join the Mummers in their merry-making. Mummers usually come out between December 26 and January 6 (the 12 Days of Christmas). However, some come out only before Christmas Day.

    Detail image of a newspaper article from a 1916 newspaper with the headline "Christmas in Newfoundland."

    “Christmas in Newfoundland,” The Prescott Daily News (Prescott, AR), December 16, 1916.

  14. This country’s folk tradition has it that mischievous Kallikantzaroi, or hobgoblins, rise from the underground to wreak havoc during the 12 days of Christmas. To make sure they disappear, priests travel to homes on the day of the Epiphany, January 6, and bless them with holy water.
    Image of the flag of Greece. Greece – Kala Christouyenna!
    A very old traditional decoration is a shallow wooden bowl with a piece of wire suspended across the rim; a sprig of basil wrapped around a wooden cross and hangs from the wire. Some water is kept in the bowl to keep the basil alive and fresh. Once a day, usually the mother of the family, dips the cross and basil into some holy water and uses it to sprinkle water in each room of the house. This is believed to keep the “kallikantzaroi” Καλλικάντζαρος (bad spirits) away. The kallikantzaroi are meant to appear only during the 12-day period from Christmas to Epiphany (January 6). They are supposed to come from the middle of the earth and get into people’s houses through the chimney! They do things like put out fires and make milk go bad. Having a fire burning through the twelve days of Christmas is meant to keep the kallikantzaroi away.

    Detail image of an article from a 1946 newspaper with the headline "Karkantzari's Fear of Burned Leather."

    “Karkantzari’s Fear of Burned Leather,” Nogales International (Nogales, AZ), December 25, 1946.

  15. In this country, December 25 is a public holiday, but in memory of Mohammed Ali Jinnah, the country’s founder.
    Image of the flag of Pakistan. Pakistan – Bara Din Mubarrak Ho!
    December 25 is a public holiday called Bara Din, but it is in memory of Mohammed Ali Jinnah, the founder of Pakistan. Like in India, Christians make up a very small part of the population, but the country has roughly 1.3 million Christians and Christmas celebrations do take place. During the last week of Advent, carol singing takes place in many Christian areas. They go from house to house singing carols and in return the family offers something to the choir. In large Christian areas, each house is decorated with a star on the roof and the streets are lit with lights. The crib and Christmas tree are also important decorations and there are sometimes crib competitions! On Christmas Eve, churches are packed for the midnight or vigil mass services. Afterwards, in some places, there are fireworks which help celebrate the start of Bara Din. People dance, exchange presents and enjoy the special night.

    Detail image from a 1947 newspaper which features a drawn portrait of Mohammer Ali Jinnah, the founder of Pakistan. Text from the article in the newspaper bookends the portrait on either side.

    Portrait of Mohammed Ali Jinnah. Evening Star (Washington, DC), June 15, 1947.

  16. Straw is a traditional decoration in this country. It is normally spread on the table top and then covered with a clean, white tablecloth.
    Image of the flag of Lithuania.  Lithuania – Linksmu Kalėdu! Straw is typically spread on the top of a table and then covered with a clean, white tablecloth. The table is then decorated with candles and small branches or twigs from a fir tree. The straw reminds people of the baby Jesus lying in a manger. A superstition says that if you pull a piece of straw from under the tablecloth and it’s long, you will have a long life; but if it’s short you will have a short life; and a thick straw means a rich and happy life!

    Detail image of an article in a 1964 newspaper with the headline "Christmas in Lithuania Featured." Included in the article is a photo of 3 females dressed in traditional Lithuanian garments placing straw underneath a white tablecloth on a table.

    “Christmas in Lithuania Featured,” Chicago Tribune (Chicago, IL), December 13, 1964, p. SW2.

  17. One of the most famous Christmas carols, “Silent Night,” was written in this country in 1818. 
    Image of the flag of Austria. Austria – Frohe Weihnachten! Christmas in Austria really starts around 4 p.m. on Christmas Eve (“Heilige Abend”) when the tree is lit for the first time and people come to sing carols around the tree. Silent Night (“Stille Nacht”) was originally written by a priest, Fr. Joseph Mohr, in Mariapfarr, Austria in 1816. Music was later added to it in 1818 by his school teacher friend Franz Gruber, for the Christmas service at St. Nicholas church in Oberndorf, Austria. After a flood damaged the church, the parishioners rebuilt the church on higher ground with the Silent Night Memorial Chapel erected on the site of the original St. Nicholas Church altar to commemorate the carol.

    Detail image from a 1956 newspaper of young carolers holding candles with musical bars of the Christmas carol "Silent Night" featured above them.

    Carolers singing “Silent Night.” Evening Star (Washington, DC), December 23, 1956.

  18. Although Christmas isn’t widely celebrated in this country, a winter solstice festival called “Yalda Night” or “Chelleh Night” is celebrated on the darkest day of the year (between December 20-22).
    Image of the flag of Iran. Iran – Krismas Mobaarak!
    Although Christmas isn’t widely celebrated in Iran, there is another important event that happens around the time of Christmas. In Iran/Persian culture, the winter solstice (December 21) is known as “Yalda Night” (Shab-e Yalda) or “Chelleh Night” (Shab-e Chelleh) and it’s a time when families and friends come together to eat, drink and recite poetry. Shab-e Chelleh means “night of forty” as it happens forty nights into winter. The word Yalda means “birth” and comes from when early Christians, who lived in Persia at the time, celebrated the birth of Jesus around the time of the winter solstice. Eating fruits, nuts, pomegranates and watermelons are important at Yalda/Chelleh and you can get Yalda cakes that look like watermelons!

    Detail image of an article from a 2001 newspaper with the headline "Iranians Welcome Winter With a Ritual From Ancient Persia."

    “Iranians Welcome Winer With a Ritual From Ancient Persia,” New York Times (New York, NY), December 23, 2001, p. A13.

  19. Instead of just one Santa, this country is visited by thirteen “Yule Lads.”
    Image of the flag of Iceland. Iceland – Gleðileg Jól!
    Christmas is often known as “Jól” (Yule) in Iceland. This comes from the ancient winter solstice celebrations that were taken over by the early Christians and it also includes the New Year celebrations. There are many Jól customs and traditions in Iceland. One popular custom is the coming of the Jóltide Lads or “Yule Lads.” These are magical people who come down from the mountains in Iceland each day, a different Yule Lad (13 in total), from December 12 to Jól Eve. The most common names of the Yule Lads:
    Stekkjarstaur – Gimpy
    Giljagaur – Gully Imp
    Stúfur – Itty Bitty
    Þvörusleikir – Pot Scraper Licker
    Pottasleikir – Pot Licker
    Askasleikir – Bowl Licker
    Hurðaskellir – Door Slammer
    Skyrgámur – Skyr Gobbler (Skyr, an Icelandic yoghurt)
    Bjúgnakrækir – Sausage Snatcher
    Gluggagægir – Window Peeper
    GáttaÞefur – Doorway Sniffer
    Ketkrókur – Meat Hooker
    Kertasníkir – Candle Beggar
    The Yule Lads are thought of as playful imps or elves who like a lot to eat and play tricks on people. They leave little presents for children in shoes placed on the windowsill. If children have been naughty, they might leave a potato or message telling them to be good. They start going home on Christmas Day.

    Detail image from a 2018 newspaper featuring 4 male figures dressed in light pants and dark sweaters with knit caps on their heads and wearing long white beards.

    “Yule Lads bring delights, frights to Iceland,” Winnipeg Free Press (Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada), December 14, 2018, p. 41.

  20. The roots of the strange modern tradition of the “Christmas Pickle” ornament in the U.S. has been attributed to this country, although most people in said country have never heard of the Christmas Pickle!
    Image of the flag of Germany.  Germany – Fröhliche Weihnachten! Germany is well known for its Christmas Markets where all sorts of seasonal foods and decorations are sold. Perhaps the most famous German decorations are glass ornaments. These glass ornaments were originally hand blown and imported to the U.S. in the 1880s by Woolworth retail stores; some in the shape of fruits and vegetables. In America, legend has it that the Christmas Pickle is a very old German tradition. The pickle is the last ornament to be hung on the Christmas tree and then the first child to find the pickle gets an extra present. However, most people in Germany have never heard of the Christmas Pickle!

    Detail image of an article from a 2016 newspaper with the headline "The Christmas Pickle: A Tradition Taken With a Pinch of Salt." Included in the article is an image of a glass ornament shaped like a pickle hanging from a Christmas tree branch.

    “The Christmas Pickle: A Tradition Taken With a Pinch of Salt,” New York Times (New York, NY), December 24, 2016, p. A3.

    Please note that the author of this quiz has culled together the majority of this information about international Christmas traditions from newspapers and has not personally celebrated Christmas in any other countries outside the United States. So if you are from one of the countries mentioned in the quiz, or spent some time in these countries, and you would like to elaborate on the Christmas traditions of a particular country or tell us what we may have gotten wrong, or share even more, please do so in the comments!

Detail image from a 1931 newspaper of a candle aflame with mistletoe at its base. The lit flame is surrounded with the text "a merry Christmas to you all!"

“A Merry Christmas to you all!,” Carbon County News (Red Lodge, MT), December 24, 1931.

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* The Chronicling America historic newspapers online collection is a product of the National Digital Newspaper Program and jointly sponsored by the Library and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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2 Comments

  1. Jason
    December 16, 2021 at 3:37 pm

    Fun! I did terrible.

  2. Diane
    December 21, 2021 at 10:37 am

    Thank you for this fascinating collection of customs.

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