“Women Have the Vote!”

One hundred years ago this week, on November 2, 1920, the United States presidential election was held. It was the first presidential election held after the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, which granted women the right to vote. Incidentally – and as holders of the Library’s main newspaper collections, we can’t <not> mention it – […]

Cooking Up History: Homemade Halloween

This post was written by Rachel Gordon, Visitor Services Specialist in the Library’s Center for Learning, Literacy and Engagement. It was originally published on Minerva’s Kaleidoscope: Resources for Kids & Families Blog. For Halloween 2020, we’re all going to be staying much closer to home than is the norm. That made me wonder what we […]

The Murder of Rasputin

Without a flicker of emotion, Russian aristocrat, Prince Felix Yussupov, declared on the witness stand that he killed Russia’s “Mad Monk,” Rasputin. Yussupov described in detail how he helped poison, shoot, beat, and drown him, as part of a larger conspiracy to murder the mystical “holy man,” who had gained powerful influence over the Imperial […]

La Prensa: Latinx Exile Newspapers

This blog post was written by Jennie Horton, a 2020 Librarian-in-Residence in the Serial & Government Publications Division.  Unrest in Latin America caused many to flee to the United States. Exile newspapers, Spanish-language papers published in the US, helped immigrants stay connected to their homeland, language, and culture. Spanish-language newspapers first appeared in the United States in 1808 with El […]

Belva Lockwood: Suffragist, Lawyer, and Presidential Candidate

Belva Ann Bennett Lockwood was an American feminist and lawyer who was the first woman admitted to argue a case in front of the U.S. Supreme Court. Her work “blazed the way for independent womanhood, often in the face of ridicule as well as contemptuous opposition.” At the time of her death, she was the […]