{ subscribe_url:'//blogs.loc.gov/share/sites/library-of-congress-blogs/inside_adams.php' }

Cherry Blossom Time

THOMAS JEFFERSON MEMORIAL FRAMED BY BLOSSOMS from the National Park Service

THOMAS JEFFERSON MEMORIAL FRAMED BY BLOSSOMS from the National Park Service

The National Park Service reported that the Washington Tidal Basin cherry blossoms reached their peak this year on March 31.  This is when at least 70 per cent of the blossoms are open.  But for those of you who haven’t visited yet, do not be discouraged–the flowers will continue to show off their radiant beauty in the coming week. 

It was an amazing day yesterday in Washington, the sun was shining, the sky was blue and the temperature was in the 70’s- a far cry from our blizzard of 2010 days.  Without a doubt, it was the perfect day to take a field trip down to the Tidal Basin– afterall, I had to do  research for this post. 

 It was a mass exodus of people heading to the blooming cherry trees. Everywhere you looked there were people on foot or in tour buses, taxis and cars; all  flocking to the trees.  Yes, we were all on a mission-  to sit, stare, and reflect upon the pink and white petals of the cherry trees. It is truly a magical experience to sit under a cherry tree in full bloom and look up at these delicate and beautiful blossoms.

If you can’t make it to Washington to see the cherry blossoms, the good news is there are cherry blossom festivals held all around the United States and Japan.  If you would like to learn more about the local blossoms or the festivals held elsewhere, check out our guide to Cherry Blossoms Internet Resources.

2 Comments

  1. Stacy Alperin
    May 7, 2010 at 5:21 am

    This is very un-original i saw the exact same post on twitter with the same exact title “Cherry Blossom Time Inside Adams”. Is that where you got your post?

  2. Donna Scanlon
    May 7, 2010 at 11:06 am

    Thank you for the comment. Our post would be the original and it is quite likely that someone tweeted the post which is why you saw it on Twitter. This would not be the first time that our posts have been tweeted. Thanks!

Add a Comment

This blog is governed by the general rules of respectful civil discourse. You are fully responsible for everything that you post. The content of all comments is released into the public domain unless clearly stated otherwise. The Library of Congress does not control the content posted. Nevertheless, the Library of Congress may monitor any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove content for any reason whatever, without consent. Gratuitous links to sites are viewed as spam and may result in removed comments. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on the Library site. Read our Comment and Posting Policy.

Required fields are indicated with an * asterisk.