{ subscribe_url:'//blogs.loc.gov/share/sites/library-of-congress-blogs/inside_adams.php' }

Is there a pyrotechnic display in your future?

Washington, D.C. July 4th Fireworks 2007

234 years ago the Second Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence announcing the colonies’ separation from Great Britain.  It has been estimated that there were approximately 2.5 million people in this new nation at that time. [1]

Today a celebration of our independence takes place every year on the anniversary of the signing of this document by our founding fathers.  Fireworks are a prominent feature of this celebration along with BBQs and gatherings of family and friends.  We have grown a bit since gaining our independence – the population for this July 4th is estimated to be 309.6 million.[1]

No doubt you have witnessed the fireworks stands that begin popping up in June in anticipation of this occasion.  Many local areas plan events culminating with a fireworks display to the delight of young and old alike.  According to the American Pyrotechnics Association we consume more than 200 million pounds of fireworks each year.  A surprising 186 million pounds of that consumption is from consumers rather than those used for displays.[2] For 2008 that amounted to revenue of $940 million.[3]

Additional information and resources are available in our guide for the Pyrotechnics Industry.

Other resources covering events leading up to this momentous occasion:

Best wishes for a fun & safe 4th of July!


[1] U.S. Census Bureau, Facts for Features: The Fourth of July 2010

[2] U.S. Fireworks Consumption Figures 2000 – 2008.  American Pyrotechnic Association

[3] U.S. Fireworks Industry Revenue Figures 1998 – 2008.  American Pyrotechnic Association

No Comments

Add a Comment

This blog is governed by the general rules of respectful civil discourse. You are fully responsible for everything that you post. The content of all comments is released into the public domain unless clearly stated otherwise. The Library of Congress does not control the content posted. Nevertheless, the Library of Congress may monitor any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove content for any reason whatever, without consent. Gratuitous links to sites are viewed as spam and may result in removed comments. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on the Library site. Read our Comment and Posting Policy.

Required fields are indicated with an * asterisk.