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Science Resources for Teachers

Students in a science class conducting experiments, Western High School, Washington, D.C. 1899?

Keeping with the back to school theme I thought it might be helpful if I outlined some of our K-12 science material that was specifically created for teachers, students, and parents.

We are fortunate to have on staff a former elementary school librarian who knows the Library’s science fair and teaching collections inside and out. She shares this knowledge in a number of helpful guides, such as the LC Science Tracer Bullet Science Fair Projects and the guide to Internet Resources for Teachers.

We also have a local high school physics teacher, who volunteers on Saturdays and  keeps us up to date in the world of teaching physics. His guide Introductory Physics provides a basic list of resources for those wanting to know something about the science, methods, people, and discoveries of physics.

As you can tell, our librarians have created a variety of guides (LC Science Tracer Bullets, Science Reference Guides, and Selected Internet Resources) on almost every science topic imaginable. It can be tough wading through these guides for the information you seek. To help resolve this issue for teachers, we selected material that directly relates to studying and teaching science in the Subject Guide- For Students & Teachers. In this guide you will find helpful roadmaps to all types of science fair projects and experiments, science biographies and science education.

One Comment

  1. Gabriela Hospedaje
    September 22, 2010 at 2:33 pm

    For the subject of my MBA thesis, I choose The innovation and the technology applied to the education. Very useful the site of the Internet resources.

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