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A Short Visit from a Noted Gentleman

Flat Stanley came to the Library of Congress for a short visit from Ms. Thacker’s first grade class in Frankfort, KY. We took a few photographs and thought we would share them.

(For those who don’t know, Flat Stanley is a great activity for schoolchildren to learn about other places from the people that live there.)

At the Adams Building

foreign telephonebooks

Foreign telephone books

Frankfort telephone books

Lexington telephone books

Pneumatic tubes in the Adams Building

Marble Owl in the Science & Business Reading Room, Adams Building

4 Comments

  1. Sheila Patterson
    December 2, 2010 at 1:34 pm

    So nice to see Flat Stanley is visiting so many interesting places !

  2. Matosha Thacker
    December 2, 2010 at 2:03 pm

    Thank you for making Stanley’s visit special. We really love all the pictures, especially the old Frankfort telephone books. It was very nice of you to help us learn more about the Library of Congress. We have one question. What are the pneumatic tubes used for?

    Thank you, again!
    Mrs. Thacker’s First Grade Class
    Frankfort, KY

  3. Ellen Terrell
    December 2, 2010 at 2:33 pm

    The tubes are used to send paper copies of a request slip that a research has filled out from the reading room down to the people that pull the books in the stacks.

  4. Gail Petri
    December 3, 2010 at 8:38 pm

    Flat Stanley is an amazing traveler. I wonder if he found this 1871 Frankfort, Kentucky map while exploring? Bird’s eye view of the city of Frankfort, the capital of Kentucky 1871. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.gmd/g3954f.pm002340 If not, you cat go online and explore it in detail. Have fun!

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