{ subscribe_url:'//blogs.loc.gov/share/sites/library-of-congress-blogs/inside_adams.php' }

Fly Me to the Moon: Celebrating Apollo 11 at 50 with a Quilt & Book Display

This post was authored by Nanette Gibbs, Business Reference Librarian, and Sean Bryant, Science Reference Librarian, of the Science, Technology, and Business Division.

The Science, Technology and Business Division is celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon mission with a display of books from the Library’s general collection, paired with a selection of fiber art quilts from the private Fly Me to the Moon collection. The quilts will be on display beginning July 16th, the anniversary of the mission launch, through July 17th, from 8:30am to 3:00pm each day, in the Science and Business Reading Room on the 5th floor of the John Adams Building. The books will remain on display through July 24th, the anniversary of the astronauts’ return to Earth.

Original photograph of the splashdown of Apollo 14 as included in Apollo: through the eyes of the astronauts [//lccn.loc.gov/2008049045] p.97

Splashdown by Sarah Entsminger, used with permission. (Fly me to the moon [//lccn.loc.gov/2017935097]. p.135

The Fly Me to the Moon quilt collection was the idea of Susanne Miller Jones, who authored a book about it: Fly me to the moon, an art quilt journey.  She was originally inspired by the upcoming 50th anniversary of the July 20, 1969 Apollo 11 moon landing, and the book’s title and theme also reflect the author’s favorite song, “Fly me to the moon.”  The book features narratives by the artists highlighting their interpretations of the theme and the resultant design choices. Many of these narratives include treasured childhood memories of the space program.

In October 2017, a selection of the Fly Me to the Moon quilts were featured in a Science and Business Reading Room display celebrating the Moon. The new display will include returning quilts, as well as quilts not seen previously at the Library of Congress.

Several of the artists will be on hand to answer questions.

Add a Comment

This blog is governed by the general rules of respectful civil discourse. You are fully responsible for everything that you post. The content of all comments is released into the public domain unless clearly stated otherwise. The Library of Congress does not control the content posted. Nevertheless, the Library of Congress may monitor any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove content for any reason whatever, without consent. Gratuitous links to sites are viewed as spam and may result in removed comments. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on the Library site. Read our Comment and Posting Policy.

Required fields are indicated with an * asterisk.