{ subscribe_url:'//blogs.loc.gov/share/sites/library-of-congress-blogs/inside_adams.php' }

A Family of Pharmacists

This post was authored by Denise Dempsey, Science Reference & Research Specialist, in the Science, Technology, and Business Division of the Library of Congress. She is also author of the blog post “Hidden Figures No More: African American Women in Space Exploration.” One of the items in the Picture This blog post, Portraits of Nineteenth […]

An American in Orbit: The Story of John Glenn

This post was authored by Sean Bryant, Science Reference & Research Specialist in the Science, Technology, and Business Division of the Library of Congress. Fifty five years ago this week John Hershel Glenn Jr. rode an Atlas rocket into a cloudy February morning. In his Mercury space capsule Friendship 7, Glenn became the third person, […]

Hidden Figures No More: African American Women in Space Exploration

Today’s post was written by Denise Dempsey a Science Reference Librarian. The recent release of the new film Hidden Figures, based on the book of the same name by Margot Lee Shetterly, presents a great opportunity to learn more about the contributions of African American women to the Space Race and to space exploration. The […]

Emily Greene Balch: Economist, Sociologist, Pacifist, and Nobel Laureate

The month of January marks the birthday of Emily Greene Balch (1867-1961), an American economist, sociologist, political scientist, and pacifist who rose to prominence during and after World War I. Balch began her career as a faculty member at Wellesley College in 1896 and became a full professor in 1913. As an academic, Balch studied […]

On Researching Capitalists, Financiers, and Builders of Empires

I have written several posts on industrialists and capitalists from America’s past – J.P. Morgan, Hetty Green, Andrew Carnegie, James Swan, and Jay Gould and James Fisk. But for those researching people who haven’t yet been featured, there are some great resources. One of the most accessible sources is the encyclopedias, available in most public, […]

Esther Howland and the Business of Love

Today’s guest post is by Mary Champagne, a reference librarian in the Main Reading Room. Her specialties are post-Civil War U.S. History and Anthropology. Esther Howland, known as “New England’s first career woman,” was a visionary artist and entrepreneur who popularized Valentine’s Day cards in the United States. Beautiful and elaborate European valentines were available […]