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Pedaling Through History: A Look at Cycling Collections Across the Library of Congress

The Library’s curators and specialists are gearing up and pounding the pedals for an exciting tour of the Library’s collections related to the history of cycling for visiting historians of the International Cycling History Conference.  On Friday August 8, 2014 from 1:30-3:00 p.m. the Mumford Room, in the Library’s Madison Building, will be the hub […]

Getting Around: Presidential Wheels

Today’s post is authored by Constance Carter, head of the science reference section. Connie has written for Inside Adams before- see her posts on Civil War Thanksgiving Foods,  Food Thrift, the Chocolate Chip Cookie, LC Science Tracer Bullets, and her mentor Ruth S. Freitag. Knowing my interest in all things presidential, a colleague recently left a copy […]

300 Years of Imaginary Space Ships: 1630-1920

The following is a guest post from Trevor Owens, Special Curator for the Library of Congress Science Literacy Initiative and Digital Archivist in the Office of Strategic Initiatives.  He is also the author of the Inside Adams post on Envisioning Earth from Space before We Went There. While humans didn’t build apparatus capable of traveling to the […]

No Opera, No X-Rays!

The following is a guest post by Emmy-Award-winning engineer Mark Schubin who is a frequent researcher at the Library of Congress. He has been writing about the intersecting histories of opera and media technology since 1972 and currently serves as engineer-in-charge of the Metropolitan Opera’s Media Department. In October 2011, Mark gave a presentation at the Library […]

The Aeronauts

Last week I had the fantastic opportunity to give a gallery talk in the Library’s Civil War in America Exhibit Hall about the role of technology. There were many technologies or tools in use or being developed at this time, such as the telegraph, ironclad steamships (e.g. Merrimack and Monitor), railroads, Minie balls, and medicine. However, the focus […]

Why I Walked Away from the Word “Cyborg”

Today’s guest post is by ST&B’s upcoming speaker Michael Chorost who will be at the Library on March 20 to talk about How to Put Your Brain on the Internet: Lessons From a Cyborg and sign copies of his books  World Wide Mind: The Coming Integration of Humanity, Machines, and the Internet (2011) and Rebuilt : […]

Greatest Inventions: 2012 and 1913 Editions

As we approach the end of another year of the Gregorian calendar, publishers and the media provide a look back at their top news stories or ‘best of’ from the past year. Scientific publishers also provide retrospectives of the year that tend to focus on top inventions, such as Popular Science’s Invention Awards (also see […]

Watching Baseball at the Opera House

The following is a guest post by Emmy-Award-winning engineer Mark Schubin. He has been writing about the intersecting histories of opera and media technology since 1972 and currently serves as engineer-in-charge of the Metropolitan Opera’s Media Department. In October 2011, Mark gave a presentation at the Library on the “Fandom of the Opera: How a […]

Pic of the Week: Scientific Treasures

This week I participated in the Science at Risk: Toward a National Strategy for Preserving Online Science meeting hosted by the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program (NDIIPP). During this two-day meeting the Library’s recently-retired manuscript specialist Len Bruno took us on a journey through the scientific treasures of the Library’s  Manuscript Division. On display were items […]