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4 Corners: International Collections Program Calendar (5/6-14/2016)

Friday, May 6, 2016, noon – 1 p.m.
Lecture: Political Interrogations and Human Rights Violations in the Brazilian Military Dictatorship
Professor Mariana Joffili (State University of Santa Catarina, Brazil)

Professor Mariana Joffili (State University of Santa Catarina, Brazil) will discuss her research on military dictatorships and human rights violations in Latin America. This event is co-sponsored by the Hispanic Division and the Hispanic Cultural Society.
Location: Mary Pickford Theater, James Madison Building, 3rd floor.
Metro stop: Capitol South
Event is free and open to the public.
Contact: [email protected]
Request ADA accommodations five days in advance at 202.707.6362 or [email protected]
Click here for more information.

 

Wednesday, May 11, 2016, noon – 1 p.m.

Lecture and Discussion: The Schools that Peter the Great Built: “Projectors” and the State in Early  Modern Russia
Historian Igor Fedyukin

The European Division presents a discussion with historian Igor Fedyukin on “The Schools that Peter the Great Built: ‘Projectors’ and the State in Early Modern Russia.” Fedyukin is Associate Professor of History at the National Research University, Higher School of Economics (Moscow) and currently a Visiting Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center for Scholars. The talk will focus on his current research for a book which, among other points, refutes the received wisdom that Peter I single-handedly designed schools and other institutions, and forced them on an unwilling public. A greater role was played by the “administrative entrepreneurs” (or projecteurs, as they were called) who pursued their own career goals and pet ideas, and competed for status and resources. Prof. Fedyukin will look at the relative roles of individual initiative and the “state,” in the context of the “Westernizing” autocracy.
Location: European Division Conference Room, LJ-250, Jefferson Building (enter through LJ-240, Hispanic Reading Room)
Metro stop: Capitol South
Free and open to the public.
Request ADA accommodations five days in advance at 202.707.6362 or [email protected]
Click here for more information.

 

Jesse Kercheval (Credit: Dan Fuller)

Thursday, May 12, 2016, 6:30 p.m.
Book Talk: CELEBRATING IDEA VILARIÑO’S POETRY
with poet and translator Jesse Lee Kercheval

Poet and translator Jesse Lee Kercheval will read selections of Idea Vilariño’s poetry, featured in Poet Lore Magazine’s spring 2016 issue; as well as from translations of other noteworthy Urugayan women poets. Vilariño (1920-2009) was a poet, essayist, literary critic, and one of the country’s most influential literary figures of the 20th century. This event is co-sponsored by the Hispanic Division, the Poetry and Literature Center and Poet Lore Magazine.
Location: Montpelier Room, James Madison Building, 6th floor. Metro stop: Capitol South.
Book sales will follow / Event is free and open to the public.
Contact: [email protected]
Request ADA accommodations five days in advance at 202.707.6362 or [email protected]
Click here for more information.

 

Friday, May 13, 2016, noon – 1 p.m.
Lecture: The Literary Legacy of ÁLVARO MUTIS
Charlotte Rogers, Assistant Professor, University of Virginia

Assistant Professor of Spanish Charlotte Rogers (University of Virginia) will discuss the work
and legacy of Álvaro Mutis, one of Colombia’s most prominent poets and prose writers, author of the acclaimed compendium “Adventures and Misadventures of Maqroll.” This event is co-sponsored by the Hispanic Division and the Poetry and Literature Center of the Library of Congress.
Location: Whittall Pavillion, Jefferson Building, ground floor. Metro stop: Capitol South.
Event is free and open to the public.
Contact: [email protected]
Request ADA accommodations five days in advance at 202.707.6362 or [email protected]
Click here for more information.

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