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4 Corners: International Collections Program Calendar, 11/9/2017

Tuesday, November 14, 2017, 11 a.m.
Hispanic Reading Room Research Orientation

Sign up for our research orientation and learn about the Hispanic Reading Room services and collections. Orientations are offered to the public the second Tuesday of every month from 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Those attending should obtain a Library of Congress Reader Identification Card prior to the session. For more information about reader’s cards, see here.
Location: Hispanic Reading Room, Thomas Jefferson Building, LJ-240. Attendees should use the First Street Carriage Entrance of the Jefferson Building.
Contact: cola@loc.gov
Request ADA accommodations five business days in advance at (202) 707-6362 (Voice/TTY) or email Ada@loc.gov

 

Reformation at 500 Lecture FlyerTuesday, November 14, 2017, 12:30 p.m.
Lecture: The Reformation at 500: German Treasures in the USA

The European Division, Library of Congress and the German Embassy jointly present The Reformation at 500: German Treasures in the USA, an illustrated lecture commemorating the 500th anniversary of the start of the Protestant Reformation by Tom Rassieur, John E. Andrus III Curator of Prints and Drawings Minneapolis Institute of Art. In the run-up to this year’s observation of the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s posting of his 95 Theses on October 31, 1517, German and American partners collaborated to bring to the United States exhibitions of historically relevant artworks and objects associated with Luther and his contemporaries. Many of these items had never before left Germany. The largest of the exhibitions, “Martin Luther: Art and the Reformation,” took place at the Minneapolis Institute of Art from October 30, 2016 to January 15, 2017. This talk by eminent art historian and Minneapolis Institute of Art curator Tom Rassieur will address the formation of the exhibition and elucidate the stories they tell about people and events that radically altered the course of European and American history. Free and open to the public.
Presented in conjunction with “Martin Luther as Priest, Heretic, and Outlaw: The Reformation at 500,” a Library of Congress display on view in the Jefferson Building through January 1, 2018.
Location: Room LJ-119, First Floor, Thomas Jefferson Building, Library of Congress, 101 Independence Ave., SE, Washington, DC 20540. Metro stop: Capitol South.
Contact: Erika Spencer (202) 707-4371 or email espencer@loc.gov
Request ADA accommodations five business days in advance at (202) 707-6362 (Voice/TTY) or email ada@loc.gov

 

Mapping a Persian Literary SphereFriday, November 17, 2017, 4 p.m.
Lecture: Mapping a Persian Literary Sphere

The John W. Kluge Center and the African and Middle East Division at the Library of Congress presents “Mapping a Persian Literary Sphere,” by Kevin Schwartz, Kluge Fellow, 2016, Researcher at the Oriental Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences in Prague. In this presentation Dr. Schwartz uses tazkirahs to map divergent conceptualizations of the world of Persian literary culture, connecting tazkirahs to one another through their geographically and historically diverse use of documented sources and methods of cataloguing and classification. In doing so this project at once seeks to understand how different individuals demarcated the conceptual and geographic boundaries of the nineteenth century Persianate world and to pay homage to the tazkirah genre as historical source itself, one of the most underestimated sources in documenting the intellectual, social, and cultural life in the wider Persianate world. Using modern mapping technology Dr. Swchartz traces how these texts travelled throughout the Middle East and the greater Persianate world.
Location: Room LJ-119, First Floor, Thomas Jefferson Building, Library of Congress, 101 Independence Ave., SE, Washington, DC 20540. Metro stop: Capitol South.
Contact: (202) 707-0213, scholarly@loc.gov
Request ASL and ADA accommodations five days in advance at 202-707-6362 or ADA@loc.gov

 

Sad Visionary: Lima Barreto and Racial Inequality in BrazilThursday, November 30, 2017, 3 p.m.
Sad Visionary: Lima Barreto and Racial Inequality in Brazil

Brazil was one of the last countries to abolish slavery in 1888, a system that has had lasting effects in Brazilian society. Few writers examined this period like Afonso Henriques de Lima Barreto. The grandchild of former slaves, he was a witness and fierce critic of the new Brazilian Republic. In this talk, historian Lilia Moritz Schwarcz will discuss her new biography of Lima Barreto and what it meant to write and live as a black man in a racist society. The conversation will be moderated by Professor Bryan McCann (History, Georgetown University). This talk will be in English.
Illustration. Lima Barreto, Dalton Paula. 2017.
Location: Mary Pickford Theater, 3rd floor, James Madison Memorial Building
Free and open to the public
Contact: tguz@loc.gov
Request ADA accommodations five business days in advance at (202) 707-6362 (Voice/TTY) or email Ada@loc.gov

 

Tuesday, December 12, 2017, 11 a.m.
Hispanic Reading Room Research Orientation

Sign up for our research orientation and learn about the Hispanic Reading Room services and collections. Orientations are offered to the public the second Tuesday of every month from 11:00am-12:00pm. Those attending should obtain a Library of Congress Reader Identification Card prior to the session. For more information about reader’s cards, see here.
Location: Hispanic Reading Room, Thomas Jefferson Building, LJ-240. Attendees should use the First Street Carriage Entrance of the Jefferson Building.
Contact: cola@loc.gov
Request ADA accommodations five business days in advance at (202) 707-6362 (Voice/TTY) or email Ada@loc.gov

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