{ subscribe_url:'//blogs.loc.gov/share/sites/library-of-congress-blogs/international-collections.php' }

4 Corners: International Collections Program Calendar, 3/9/2018

Hispanic Reading RoomTuesday, March 13, 2018, 11 a.m.
Hispanic Reading Room Research Orientation

Sign up for our research orientation and learn about the Hispanic Reading Room services and collections. Orientations are offered to the public the second Tuesday of every month from 11 a.m. – 12 p.m. Those attending should obtain a Library of Congress Reader Identification Card prior to the session. Click here for more information about reader’s cards.
Location: Hispanic Reading Room, Thomas Jefferson Building, LJ-240. Attendees should use the First Street Carriage Entrance of the Jefferson Building.
Contact: [email protected]
Request ADA accommodations five business days in advance at (202) 707-6362 (Voice/TTY) or email [email protected].

 

Snapshots of Ottoman Women program flyerTuesday, March 13, 2018, noon – 1 p.m.
Lecture: Snapshots of Ottoman Women in Court Records

In celebration of Women’s History Month, the Near East Section of the African and Middle Eastern Division of the Library of Congress presents “Snapshots of Ottoman Women in Court Records,” featuring Bertul Basaran, Associate Professor, Religious Studies, St. Mary’s College, MD. Free and open to the public.
Location: African and Middle Eastern Reading Room, LJ-220, 2nd floor, Thomas Jefferson Building, Library of Congress, 10 First Street S.E., Washington, DC 20540. Metro stop: Capitol South.
Contact: Joan Weeks, (202) 707-3657
Request ADA accommodations five business days in advance at (202) 707-6362 (Voice/TTY) or email [email protected].

 

Program lyer about a lecture titled "Moral Science in Postwar North Korean." Monday, March 26, 2018, noon – 1 p.m.
Lecture: Moral Science in Postwar North Korea

The Asian Division, Library of Congress presents “Moral Science in Postwar North Korea” by Dr. Dafna Zur. Dr. Zur teaches at the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at Stanford University. As one of the very few North Korea scholars in the U.S. who specializes in the humanities, Dr. Zur will illuminate new perspectives on North Korean youth literature and its relationship to the changing values assigned to scientific development.
Free and open to the public.
Location: Whittall Pavillion, Thomas Jefferson Building, Library of Congress, 101 Independence Ave. S.E. Washington, D.C. 20540. Metro stop: Capital South
Contact: [email protected].
Request ADA accommodations five business days in advance at (202) 707-6362 (Voice/TTY) or email [email protected].

 

Friday, March 30, 2018, noon
Lecture: Movies and Popular Culture in Spain under Francoism (1939-1975)

Under the Franco regime, Spain was a country of passionate moviegoers struggling with the enormous limitations of the cultural life under a dictatorship, a tension that will be in the center of the present talk. This is the story of a fascination with movies under difficult circumstances, in a land in which cinema became a large projection screen for the anxieties, fears and hopes of millions of spectators. Dr. Fernando Ramos Arenas is Visiting Researcher at Georgetown University in Washington DC. He was Assistant Professor at the Institute for Communication and Media Sciences at Leipzig University (Germany) from 2010 to 2017. On April 2018 he will begin as Assistant Professor at Complutense University, Madrid. Cosponsored by the Hispanic Division and Hispanic Cultural Society of the Library of Congress.
Free tickets available via Eventbrite
Location: Dining Room A, James Madison Memorial Building, 6th floor
Contact: [email protected]
Request ADA accommodations five business days in advance at (202) 707-6362 (Voice/TTY) or email [email protected].

Add a Comment

This blog is governed by the general rules of respectful civil discourse. You are fully responsible for everything that you post. The content of all comments is released into the public domain unless clearly stated otherwise. The Library of Congress does not control the content posted. Nevertheless, the Library of Congress may monitor any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove content for any reason whatever, without consent. Gratuitous links to sites are viewed as spam and may result in removed comments. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on the Library site. Read our Comment and Posting Policy.

Required fields are indicated with an * asterisk.