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Screenshot of Library of Congress webpage with recording of a virtual panel event.
A recording of “Mangyan Scripts, Literary Heritage, and Collections,” a virtual panel event hosted by the Asian Division of the Library of Congress.

US and Philippine Panelists Discuss Mangyan Scripts, Literary Heritage, and Collections: a Recording and Resources

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October is National Indigenous Peoples Month in the Philippines, and also the time of year when Indigenous Peoples’ Day is observed in the United States (October 9th, this year). As these commemorations give us an opportunity to reflect on the contributions of Indigenous peoples both in the Philippines and in the United States, it is fitting to point to an event hosted by the Asian Division of the Library of Congress on the scripts and literary heritage of the Indigenous peoples of Mindoro, Philippines, collectively known to many as the Mangyan.

An image showing screenshots and names of the 7 panelists and moderator of a virtual event entitled “Mangyan Scripts, Literary Heritage, and Collections.” The image also includes a close-up photo of three bamboo tubes with Mangyan writing.
Caption: Panelists of a virtual event hosted by the Library of Congress Asian Division, “Mangyan Scripts, Literary Heritage, and Collections.”

This event, a panel discussion entitled “Mangyan Scripts, Literary Heritage, and Collections,” took place online on September 20th, 2023. It featured presentations on Mangyan writing and literary culture, as well as Mangyan collections at the Library of Congress, the Mangyan Heritage Center, Newberry Library, and Yale Peabody Museum. In addition, audience members interacted with speakers in a Question and Answer session, which touched on such topics as Mangyan writing styles, teaching Mangyan script to children, community support for maintaining Mangyan writing, as well as possible collaborations on translation and transcription of Mangyan collections.

A recording of this event is available at https://www.loc.gov/item/webcast-11083/.

To learn more about the speakers, please view the bios of the panelists that appear at the end of an earlier blog post announcing the event.

For more information about this event or Mangyan holdings at the Library of Congress, please contact the Library’s Southeast Asian reference staff using the Ask-a-Librarian service.

A selection of resources related to Mangyan writing and literary culture at the Newberry Library, Yale Peabody Museum, Mangyan Heritage Center, and the Library of Congress is listed below.

 

Selected Resources

Newberry Library

Yale Peabody Museum

  • Collections of the Division of Anthropology at the Yale Peabody Museum, which include 900 material culture objects, such as 359 bamboo sections inscribed with Hanunuo writing from the 1950s, and approximately 15 to 20 “banker’s boxes” of field notes, correspondence, illustrations by Yāgaw residents, course notes, and drafts for publications in the Harold C. Conklin and Jean M. Conklin Collection.
  • For questions on Hanunuo Mangyan holdings and related collections at the Peabody Museum, please reach out to staff there using the following contact form: https://peabody.yale.edu/about/contact or contact Museum Assistant, Maureen DaRos White at [email protected].

Mangyan Heritage Center

Library of Congress

Available online

Available only onsite at the Library


Located near the confluence of the Potomac and Anacostia rivers, the Library of Congress acknowledges the Indigenous peoples of the United States, including the diverse and vibrant Native communities who make their home in this area today. We pay our respect to the people, past and present, of the Nacotchtank (Anacostan), Piscataway Conoy, Pamunkey and Manahoac nations, the first peoples and custodians since time immemorial of the land where the Library now provides its services.

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