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Cordel and Caribbean Poetry: Showcasing the Brazilian and Caribbean Collections

Posted by: Anchi Hoh

The Summer 2021 Junior Fellows who interned virtually with the Hispanic Reading Room shone a light on Caribbean women poets featured in the PALABRA Archive and contextualized Brazilian cordel through audio recordings of Brazilian artist J. Borges and photographic images of Andre Cypriano.

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Celebrating Indigenous Voices: New Poetry and Literature Recordings in the PALABRA Archive

Posted by: Anchi Hoh

The Hispanic Reading Room of the Library of Congress launches The PALABRA Indigenous Voices Project, a new initiative to increase the presence of Indigenous poetry and literature in the historic PALABRA Archive. Through partnerships with scholars and organizations with direct access to Indigenous communities around Latin America, curators hope to shine a light on a formerly under-represented group in this collection.

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Celebrating D.C. Baltimore Metropolitan youth poetry and Gabriela Mistral with the Gabriela Mistral Youth Poetry Competition

Posted by: Anchi Hoh

This is a guest blog interview was submitted to the Hispanic Division by patrons Anna Deeny Morales and Nelcy Denice Ávila. It offers context on The Gabriela Mistral Youth Poetry Competition as a legacy to this Chilean poet, who was the first Latin American writer to win the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1945.

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Conveyances: Poet Salgado Maranhão and Translator Alexis Levitin Join the PALABRA Archive

Posted by: Suzanne Schadl

The following is a post by Henry Granville Widener, Portuguese Language Reference Librarian, Hispanic Reading Room, Latin American, Caribbean, and European Division Words connect us in so many ways. Whether spoken, sung or written, they can act as the sinews that link our senses and emotions to one another. When I listen to the Library …