{ subscribe_url:'/share/sites/library-of-congress-blogs/insights-kluge-center.php', }

William Julius Wilson Discusses “The Declining Significance of Race” on Voice of America’s Press Conference USA

William Julius Wilson, 2015 Chair in American Law and Governance, speaks on a panel about freedom of expression during the conclusion of Scholarfest, June 11, 2015. Photo by Shawn Miller.

William Julius Wilson, 2015 Kluge Chair in American Law and Governance, speaks on a panel about freedom of expression during the conclusion of #Scholarfest, June 11, 2015. Photo by Shawn Miller.

William Julius Wilson‘s 1978 book “The Declining Significance of Race” argued that economic class had gradually become more important than race in determining the life trajectory of African Americans.

During his recent tenure as the Kluge Chair in American Law and Governance, Wilson re-examined the arguments put forth in his book, to see if they apply to the situation today. Wilson asserted that the points he raised in 1978 now seem to apply to all groups; that income inequality has increased across racial and ethnic populations, and that class has become a very significant factor in determining life chances.

Wilson’s research also examined the vulnerability of working class communities to changes in the American economy, income segregation among African Americans, and what he terms a “weak institutional resource base” in low-income neighborhoods.

Wilson discussed his research with host Carol Castiel of Voice of America’s “Press Conference USA,” in an interview recorded live inside The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress.

Listen to the full interview on the Voice of America website: http://www.voanews.com/audio/2801299.html

The Kluge Chair in American Law and Governance is a senior research position at The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress that examines domestic matters of and among the three branches of the United States government. William Julius Wilson held the chair from February to May 2015.

Add a Comment

This blog is governed by the general rules of respectful civil discourse. You are fully responsible for everything that you post. The content of all comments is released into the public domain unless clearly stated otherwise. The Library of Congress does not control the content posted. Nevertheless, the Library of Congress may monitor any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove content for any reason whatever, without consent. Gratuitous links to sites are viewed as spam and may result in removed comments. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on the Library site. Read our Comment and Posting Policy.

Required fields are indicated with an * asterisk.