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Announcing the 2020 Kluge Fellowship Selectees

The John W. Kluge Center is pleased to announce the newest cohort of Kluge Fellows at the Library of Congress. Each year, we consider dozens of applications from scholars in the social sciences and humanities for the Kluge Fellowship, eventually selecting 12 that are best-suited to the Library’s collections and the Kluge Center’s mission.

Applications are open now for the next round of fellows, with a deadline of July 15. Click here for more information and apply today.

Patrick Andelic is Lecturer in American History at Northumbria University in Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom. He will work on a history of change in American politics through a study of the congressional office of former Representative Henry Waxman.

Aaron Bryant is a Museum Curator at the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. He will work on a study of the history of early African-American photographers as well as writing by African-American thinkers on photography.

Rishad Choudhury is Assistant Professor of History at Oberlin College. He will work on a book on the politics of the South Asian hajj pilgrimage to the Mecca and Medina, and its implications for the rise of colonial domination in India and the Indian Ocean.

Michelle Jurkovich is Assistant Professor of Political Science and Faculty Affiliate with the Department of Conflict Resolution, Human Security, and Global Governance at the University of Massachusetts-Boston. She will work on a project looking at the history of ration packages distributed to refugees and what is considered “good enough” to support them.

Julia Leikin is a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of History at the University of Exeter in the United Kingdom. She will work on her book manuscript examining imperial Russia as subject and object of international law by looking at the empire’s practices at sea and contextualizing those activities in the international legal order.

Allison Madar is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Oregon. She will research and write her book project examining the legal and social dynamics of servitude in Eighteenth-Century Virginia, and the meaning of unfreedom in early modern Virginia and the wider British Atlantic world.

Claire Payton is a Postdoctoral Researcher in History at the University of Virginia. She will work on her project looking at the interaction between rural-to-urban migration in Haiti in the late 20th century and consolidation of state power in the autocratic Duvalier regime during the same period.

Sara Rahnama is Assistant Professor of History at Morgan State University. She will work on her book project looking at the emergence of women’s rights as a major issue during the interwar years in Algeria, with a view toward present-day protest movements.

David Stenner is Assistant Professor of History at Christopher Newport University. He will be working on a social history of the Second World War and its aftermath in North Africa, focusing on the lives of regular women and men.

Jeffrey Whyte is Sessional Instructor in Geography at the University of British Columbia. He will pursue a project examining the history of foreign interference and propaganda in domestic political affairs of the United States.

Elizabeth Williams is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Massachusetts-Lowell. She will work on a project examining the processes of agrarian transformation that accompanied the transition from Ottoman provinces to French Mandate states in what is now Syria and Lebanon.

Gene Zubovich is Assistant Professor of History at Mississippi State University. He will work on a book-length historical study of how Americans exported the culture wars and worked in tandem with allies in Africa, Europe, and Asia to further their visions of democracy.

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