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Kluge Center Welcomes Elizabeth Currid-Halkett into Residence

Kluge Center Welcomes Elizabeth Currid-Halkett into Residence

USC Price School of Public Policy Professor Elizabeth Currid-Halkett has been appointed as the Kluge Chair in Modern Culture at the John W. Kluge Center. She will begin her term in June 2022. This appointment is awarded to a scholar of significant accomplishment in modern arts and media and their impact on societal development.

With this appointment, Currid-Halkett will gain access to the Library of Congress’ comprehensive music, film, television, architecture, literature, multi-media and folklore collections. She will use her time as Chair to work on the manuscript of her new book forthcoming with Basic Books in 2023. The book brings together personal interviews with Americans around the country and vast datasets to better understand how culture and the politics of culture influence the current geographic and class divisions in American society.

Currid-Halkett’s research focuses on the arts, the American consumer economy and the role of cultural capital in geographic and class divides. She is the author of The Sum of Small Things: A Theory of the Aspirational Class, which was named one of the best books of the year by The Economist. Her other books include The Warhol Economy: How Fashion, Art and Music Drive New York City, and Starstruck: The Business of Celebrity. Currid-Halkett’s research has been featured in a wide variety of publications including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Financial Times, The New Yorker, and NPR.

Currid-Halkett holds the James Irvine Chair in Urban and Regional Planning and is professor of public policy at USC Price where she teaches courses in economic development, the arts, and urban policy and urban planning. She is a member of the World Economic Forum’s Expert Network, and has been a member of the WEF Global Future Councils and Industry Strategy Officers. Currid-Halkett received her PhD in urban planning from Columbia University.

 

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