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Watch: Elaine Weiss in Conversation on “The Woman’s Hour”

On March 7, the Library of Congress marked the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Award-winning journalist Elaine Weiss joined Colleen Shogan, Assistant Deputy Librarian and the Library of Congress’s designee on the Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commission, at the Kluge Center for a conversation on Weiss’s book, The […]

Connections in Sound: Irish traditional music at AFC

The following post was written by Meghan Ferriter and originally appeared on The Signal. Patrick Egan is a scholar and musician from Ireland, currently serving as Kluge Fellow in Digital Studies at the Kluge Center. He has recently submitted his PhD in digital humanities with ethnomusicology in at University College Cork. Patrick’s interests over the […]

Conflict, Fortresses, and Threat Environments in the Ancient Maya World

Stephen Houston is the Library of Congress Kislak Chair for the Study of the History and Cultures of the Early Americas, as well as Dupee Family Professor of Social Science at Brown University. In the lead-up to Professor Houston’s April 25 event at the Library, titled “Flint, Shield, and Fire: Exploring Ancient Maya Warfare,” I […]

What Did Ancient Americans Find Funny?

Stephen Houston is the Library of Congress Kislak Chair for the Study of the History and Cultures of the Early Americas, as well as Dupee Family Professor of Social Science at Brown University. In the lead-up to Professor Houston’s April 25 event at the Library, titled “Flint, Shield, and Fire: Exploring Ancient Maya Warfare,” I […]

Introducing African-American Passages: Black Lives in the 19th Century

During his time as a Distinguished Visiting Scholar here at the John W. Kluge Center, Georgetown University history professor Adam Rothman recorded an extraordinary series of podcasts. In the podcasts, Rothman examines documents from the Library of Congress’ manuscript collection relating to the lives of African-Americans in the 19th century. He found a number of […]

How to Think About Data: A Conversation with Christine Borgman

Members of the Scholars Council are appointed by the Librarian of Congress to advise on matters related to scholarship at the Library, with special attention to the Kluge Center and the Kluge Prize. The Council includes scholars, writers, researchers, and scientists. “Insights” is featuring some of the work of this group of thinkers. Dan Turello […]

“My Dear Master”: An Enslaved Blacksmith’s Letters to a President

An unusual letter arrived in the mail for the Tennessee planter James K. Polk shortly after he won the 1844 presidential election. Written from Carrollton, Mississippi, and dated November 28, 1844, the letter began “My Dear Master” and was signed by “Blacksmith Harry.” Here’s what Harry wrote: Suffer your faithful survant Harry to say a […]

Adam Rothman on Working With the Library’s Unique Omar Ibn Said Collection

While Adam Rothman, Georgetown University history professor and former Distinguished Visiting Scholar at the Kluge Center, was at the Library, he had the opportunity to work on transcribing the Library of Congress’ Omar Ibn Said Collection, which was just released online. Ibn Said was an educated, wealthy man living in West Africa until he was […]

Watch: Drew Gilpin Faust’s Speech Accepting the Kluge Prize

On September 12, 2018, Drew Gilpin Faust – historian, former Harvard University president and author of the Bancroft Prize-winning book “This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War” – accepted the John W. Kluge Prize for Achievement in the Study of Humanity. In her acceptance speech, she made an impassioned case for the […]