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The Entanglement of Power, Security, and Energy Supply

I talked with Kluge Fellow Gaetano Di Tommaso about his research project, “Petro-Modernity and Statecraft: The U.S. Energy-National Security Nexus Reconsidered (1890s-1920s).” Before coming to the Kluge Center, Tano, as we call him here, was a Teaching Fellow at Sciences Po-Paris (Reims campus), in France. Giselle: How did you become interested in U.S. history and […]

Seminoles: Power Brokers in the Florida Borderlands

When I found out that Kluge Fellow John Paul Nuño, who is an Associate Professor of History at California State University, Northridge, was using a borderlands framework to inform his research on socio-political processes affecting Americans Indians, I wanted to learn more about his topic and methodology. In November, which was Native American History Month, […]

Did the Earliest Printers Know What Print Was? What a 15th Century Book from the Netherlands Can Tell Us About Culture and Innovation

This is a guest post by Kluge Fellow Anna Dlabacova, Assistant Professor and postdoctoral researcher at Leiden University. She is researching a project titled “Inspiring, Innovative, and Influential: The Role of Gerard Leeu’s Incunabula in Late Medieval Spirituality and Devotional Practice.” She hopes to advance study on the role that incunabula from the Netherlands played […]

New Resource Guide Highlights Kislak Chair Simon Martin

In September, the John W. Kluge Center welcomed Simon Martin, anthropologist and specialist in Maya hieroglyphic writing, as the second Jay I. Kislak Chair for the Study of the History and Cultures of the Early Americas. He is working on a project called “Articulations of Power Among the Classic Maya.” We’ve created a resource guide, […]

The Assyrians, Between the State and the Opposition

Alda Benjamen is a Kluge Fellow, and was most recently a Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Pennsylvania Museum. She studies the Modern Middle East and Iraqi history, focusing on minoritization and pluralism in bilingual communities, as well as identity, memory and cultural heritage, and women and gender issues. Her current project is titled Negotiating […]

Watch: A Celebration of Earthrise

The Earth, blue and luminous, seems to rise above the moon’s surface against the vast blackness of space in the now-iconic photo “Earthrise.” Taken on December 24, 1968, aboard Apollo 8 — the first crewed spacecraft to orbit the moon — the image almost immediately captured the world’s imagination. Since then, it has been credited […]

Christian Monks and Muslim Villagers in Medieval Egypt: A Library of Congress Story

This is a guest post by Lev Weitz, a Kluge Fellow and Assistant Professor of History and Director of Islamic World Studies at the Catholic University of America.    Most visitors think of the Library of Congress as a storehouse for treasures of American history. But the Library is also home to many lesser-known collections […]

Kluge Center Welcomes Rolena Adorno, Maya Jasanoff, and Melvin L. Rogers

The John W. Kluge Center is pleased to announce the arrival of three new scholars in residence at the Library of Congress. Rolena Adorno was appointed as Kluge Chair in Countries and Cultures of the South. Adorno is Sterling Professor of Spanish at Yale University and the author of Colonial Latin American LIterature: A Very […]