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The Oldest Idea in the World?

The association of directions with colors may be the oldest known set of philosophical ideas in the world, transmitted from ancient Asia to the Americas over 10,000 years ago. Obvious Concepts Some concepts come naturally to humans. In several ancient societies, the moon relates to a goddess, and logically so, for menstruation and lunar cycles […]

Kluge Center Event Marks the Centennial of the Paris Peace Conference

On Wednesday, January 16, the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress will host “The United States and the World: Legacies of the Paris Peace Conference”. This event marks the 100th anniversary of the Paris Peace Conference, which ended World War I and previewed many of the issues that would define international affairs […]

Can Big Data Save Us from Ourselves? A Conversation About Information, Democracy, and Dystopia

On a rainy day in late spring, a pan-Asian noodle restaurant on Pennsylvania Avenue offered the perfect nook for a spirited conversation about big data, algorithms, and the construction of our legal and social realities. Among those at the table with me were Martin Hilbert, who was a Kluge Distinguished Visiting Scholar and is Associate […]

At the Crossroads of Health and Spirituality: An Interview with Joanne Braxton

The following is a guest post by Samira Mehta, Assistant Professor at Albright College and the 2015 David B. Larson Fellow in Health and Spirituality at The John W. Kluge Center. This is the first post of a two-part interview by two of our Larson Fellows. A graduate of Sarah Lawrence College and Yale University, […]

Life as it Could Be: A Conversation with Luis Campos

Fourth Astrobiology Chair Luis Campos began his tenure at the Kluge Center on October 3. A historian of science, his most recent book is “Radium and the Secret of Life” (University of Chicago Press, 2015). He will spend his fellowship year at the Kluge Center studying the history of synthetic biology and its overlap with astrobiology […]

Africa, Past and Future: A Conversation with Toyin Falola

Members of the Scholars Council are appointed by the Librarian of Congress to advise on matters related to scholarship at the Library, with special attention to the Kluge Center and the Kluge Prize. The Council includes distinguished scholars, writers, researchers and scientists. “Insights” is featuring some of the work of this highly-accomplished group of thinkers. […]

Medieval Manuscripts at the Library of Congress

“The possibility of [the] destruction of manuscripts makes accurate and thorough catalog description mandatory.” -Ilya Dines In his lecture “Medieval Manuscripts at the Library of Congress,” Kluge Fellow Ilya Dines discussed his experience cataloging medieval manuscripts at the Library and the importance of the Library’s collection. The Library holds hundreds of medieval manuscripts from a […]

Using the Kislak Collection to Study the Early Americas

This week the Kluge Center extended the application deadline for Kislak Fellowships until October 31. These unique fellowships support research related to the discovery, contact, and colonial periods, particularly (but not exclusively) in Florida, the Caribbean, and Mesoamerica using The Jay I. Kislak Collection. The Kislak Collection is an extraordinary trove of materials. It includes: […]

The Kazakh Famine of the 1930s

As a Kluge Fellow at the Library of Congress, historian Sarah Cameron researched a book project on famine in Kazakhstan, 1930-33. She sat down with Jason Steinhauer to discuss this understudied chapter in Soviet history. Hi, Sarah. Tell us briefly about the Kazakh famine of 1930-33. The Kazakh famine was the defining event in the […]