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Announcing a Single Consolidated Deadline for Our Endowed Fellowship Programs

The Kluge Center is pleased to announce that applications are now being accepted for our endowed fellowship programs at the Library of Congress. The Center offers residential fellowships to scholars and thought leaders to make use of the Library’s vast collections and digital resources. This year, four of our programs will have a new consolidated deadline of July 15, 2021. These fellowship programs include:

 

Kluge Fellowship

The Kluge Center encourages research in the humanities and social sciences that makes use of the Library’s large and varied collections. Interdisciplinary and cross-cultural research is particularly welcome in the Kluge Fellowship program. The fellowship is open to scholars in the humanities, social sciences, and related fields with special consideration given to those whose projects demonstrate relevance to contemporary challenges.

 

Kluge Fellowship in Digital Studies

The Kluge Fellowship in Digital Studies provides an opportunity for scholars  who utilize digital methods to make use of the Library’s large and varied digital collections and resources and curatorial expertise, and join an emerging community of digital scholarship practitioners. Interdisciplinary and cross-cultural research is particularly welcome in the Kluge Digital Studies program. The fellowship is open to scholars in the humanities, social sciences, and related fields with special consideration given to those whose projects demonstrate relevance to contemporary challenges.

 

David B. Larson Fellowship in Health and Spirituality

The David B. Larson Fellowship provides an opportunity for qualified scholars to apply for a post-doctoral fellowship in the field of health and spirituality. The fellowship is designed to continue Dr. Larson’s legacy of promoting meaningful scholarly study of health and spirituality, two important and increasingly interrelated fields. It seeks to encourage the pursuit of scholarly excellence in the scientific study of the relation of religiosity and spirituality to physical, mental, and social health.

 

Jon B. Lovelace Fellowship for the Study of the Alan Lomax Collection

The John B. Lovelace Fellowship provides an opportunity for qualified scholars to apply for a post-doctoral fellowship for advanced research based on the Alan Lomax Collection. The Jon B. Lovelace Fellowship supports scholarly research that contributes significantly to a greater understanding of the work of Alan Lomax and the cultural traditions he documented over the course of a vigorous and highly productive 70-year career.

Applications will be accepted up to 11:59pm, July 15, 2021 for each fellowship program. Please click here to visit our application portal to begin your application!

More information for each of these fellowship programs, including requirements and eligibility information, can be found here. Be sure to check our website for other fellowship opportunities throughout the year.

Please email [email protected] with any questions about these fellowship opportunities or the application process.

The Mexican Revolution and its Lasting Legacy on American Art and Culture

This is a guest post by Ignacio M. Sánchez Prado. He is Professor of Spanish, Latin American Studies, and Film and Media Studies and Jarvis Thurston and Mona Van Duyn Professor in the Humanities at Washington University in St. Louis. He plans to be in residence at the Kluge Center during the summer of 2021 […]

Did the Earliest Printers Know What Print Was? What a 15th Century Book from the Netherlands Can Tell Us About Culture and Innovation

This is a guest post by Kluge Fellow Anna Dlabacova, Assistant Professor and postdoctoral researcher at Leiden University. She is researching a project titled “Inspiring, Innovative, and Influential: The Role of Gerard Leeu’s Incunabula in Late Medieval Spirituality and Devotional Practice.” She hopes to advance study on the role that incunabula from the Netherlands played […]

Highlighting Kluge Scholars: An Interview With Armando Chávez-Rivera

This is another post in our series “Highlighting Kluge Scholars.” Armando Chávez-Rivera is Associate Professor and Director of the Spanish Program at the University of Houston-Victoria, Texas, and a Scholar in Residence at the Kluge Center at the Library of Congress. He earned a master’s degree in Hispanic Lexicography at the Royal Spanish Academy and […]

Kluge Center Welcomes Rolena Adorno, Maya Jasanoff, and Melvin L. Rogers

The John W. Kluge Center is pleased to announce the arrival of three new scholars in residence at the Library of Congress. Rolena Adorno was appointed as Kluge Chair in Countries and Cultures of the South. Adorno is Sterling Professor of Spanish at Yale University and the author of Colonial Latin American LIterature: A Very […]

Staff Fellow Mark Horowitz’s Book Released in Paperback

Library of Congress Staff Fellow Mark Horowitz is spending his time at the Kluge Center studying the Oscar Hammerstein Jr. correspondence, but his knowledge of the giants of musical theater extends beyond Hammerstein. In Sondheim on Music: Minor Details and Major Decisions (2003) a co-publication with the Library of Congress, Horowitz collected several interviews he […]

Introducing African-American Passages: Black Lives in the 19th Century

During his time as a Distinguished Visiting Scholar here at the John W. Kluge Center, Georgetown University history professor Adam Rothman recorded an extraordinary series of podcasts. In the podcasts, Rothman examines documents from the Library of Congress’ manuscript collection relating to the lives of African-Americans in the 19th century. He found a number of […]

Emoji, Texting and Social Media: How Do They Impact Language?

I’m here with Dame Wendy Hall, Kluge Chair in Technology and Society, Regius Professor of Computer Science at the University of Southampton and early pioneer in web protocols; with Alexandre Loktionov, AHRC Fellow at the Kluge Center and an expert on hieroglyphic and cuneiform legal texts; and with Jessica Lingel, Kluge Fellow, assistant professor at […]

Cuba After Castro: A Conversation with Lanie Millar

Lanie Millar is an assistant professor in the Department of Romance Languages at the University of Oregon. While at the Library of Congress on a Kluge Fellowship, she is doing research for her book manuscript on post-revolutionary literature from Cuba and Angola. Her project is titled, “Cuba and Angola: Cultural Conversations Before and After the Cold […]