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Kluge Center Welcomes New Director Kevin Butterfield

Kevin Butterfield, Director of the John W. Kluge Center

Kevin Butterfield, noted historian of American history and most recently executive director of the Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington at Mount Vernon, has joined the Library of Congress as Director of the John W. Kluge Center.

Butterfield succeeds Brent Yacobucci, who has returned to managing the energy and materials research section at the Congressional Research Service after serving as acting director, as well as previous director John Haskell, who retired in 2021.

Under Butterfield’s leadership, the Washington Library at Mount Vernon provided access and services to extensive materials on George Washington, colonial America, and the revolutionary era to scholars, and hosted research fellowships, public programs, and academic partnerships.

Prior to his work with the Washington Library, Butterfield was a tenured faculty member and director of the Institute for the American Constitutional Heritage and the university’s constitutional studies program. Butterfield focuses on the founding era of the United States and is the author of the award-winning 2015 book “The Making of Tocqueville’s America: Law and Association in the Early United States.”

To learn more about Kevin Butterfield, read the press release from the Library of Congress. And stay tuned for more from our blog and email list.

How the Lowly Answering Machine Contributed to our Anxiety-Ridden Culture of Continuous Communication

Josh Lauer is a 2019 Digital Studies Fellow at the John W. Kluge Center as well as Associate Professor of Communication at the University of New Hampshire. His research interests include the history of communication technologies as well as consumer credit reporting, the topic of his 2017 book “Creditworthy: A History of Consumer Surveillance and […]

The Study of Mystical Traditions is Opening a Path Toward New Forms of Religious Thought and Practice

This is a guest post by Carrie Rosefsky Wickham. Wickham is the Kluge Chair in Countries and Cultures of the South at the Library of Congress and Professor of Middle Eastern Studies at Emory University. Can one be both a religious person and a humanist? If so, what kind of worldview might this entail? Together […]

Equitable Infrastructure, Democracy, and Why Private Industry Can’t Address the Digital Divide

Now, more than ever, vast amounts of digital information are instantly available to the public. And yet, accessing digital information and online services remains a challenge for those in areas without high-speed internet access. In this interview, Ann Eisenberg, Associate Professor of Law at the University of South Carolina and current Kluge Fellow, explained the […]

How Liberal Protestants Shaped America, Part 2

This is part two of our interview with Gene Zubovich. For the first part, click here. What drew the attention of activist Protestants towards international affairs, and what impact did that have? In Before the Religious Right I discuss the work liberal Protestants were doing to fight racism, economic inequality, and to reshape American foreign […]

How Liberal Protestant Activists Shaped America

Gene Zubovich is an Assistant Professor in the Department of History at the University at Buffalo, SUNY, as well as a Kluge Fellow at the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress. He is the author of “Before the Religious Right.”  On April 19, 2022 at 4pm, Zubovich will discuss “Before the Religious […]

Navigating Liberty’s Promise: Black Women in Washington, DC and the End of Slavery

Nineteenth-century Washington, DC was home to thousands of enslaved people, as well as a hotbed of abolitionist activism. Black women were subject to incredible levels of legal and social restriction, but found ways to make their own lives within that world. Historian Tamika Nunley’s latest book, At the Threshold of Liberty: Women, Slavery, and Shifting […]

The Kluge Center Remembers Colin Powell and Madeleine Albright

In 2015, the Inaugural Daniel K. Inouye Lecture featured Madeleine Albright and Colin Powell. We highlight it here again, in memory of two dedicated patriots and public servants who exemplified the spirit of dialogue across partisan divides. For more on the legacy of Madeleine Albright, read this post on the Library of Congress blog.

How the Web Remembers: Cookies, Characters, and Consent

Meg Jones is a Kluge Fellow as well as Associate Professor in the Communication, Culture & Technology program at Georgetown University where she researches rules and technological change with a focus on privacy, memory, innovation, and automation in digital information and computing technologies. “Ctrl+Z: The Right to be Forgotten,” Meg’s first book, is about the […]